Creativity and the laugh-track of my life

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Winner’s Badge 2008

I signed up for National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) at the beginning of November, a commitment to write 50,000 words in a month. It’s fewer than 2000 words a day, so it should be—if not easy—not all that difficult. I’ve done it before – about four times since my first go at it in 2008. This year I managed about 260 words on the first day and then nothing.

Why couldn’t I sit for a couple of hours each day and simply put words down on the screen? I have an ongoing novel project that’s just crying out for fifty thousand words of first draft. I know how the story starts; I’ve written the first 17,500 words. I know how it ends (though I’m not giving that away here) but I need to work on the middle bit, the development of plot and character. I need to map out a few twists and reversals, and engineer a gradual coming together of story and motivation to bring my characters to a place where the ending can happen naturally, rather than because I (as author) insist that it will. All that is covered in my vague back-of-the-envelope plan by the phrase: Stuff Happens.

So why did all my good intention flush down the pan of life? I think I have the answer.

Creativity is not something you can pull out of a box and shove back in when you’re done with it. It’s something that should be ongoing, a process of you like.

And I have a day job.

There are not many published writers who don’t have a day job of some kind. Sure, a few full time writers are either fantastically successful beyond their wildest dreams, like J. K. Rowling, or their career runs alongside their day job for several books until they’ve built up enough back catalogue to have a steady income from royalties, and possibly a firm book deal from their publisher that gives them a guaranteed income for the next so-many years. Most writers are not that lucky. Getting the average publishing deal is nice, but it doesn’t allow you to immediately chuck in the day job. If you manage your career well, I understand that it takes a back catalogue of around twenty steadily selling novels to maintain a decent income from royalties.

6bookpicI have six novels out there at the moment (so please go and buy one or more of them), so my income from royalties might take me to the supermarket for groceries once or twice a year, and my advances are modest.

So yes, I have a day job.

I’m very lucky because I’m self-employed. I work from home as a music booking agent, and I also process Certificates of Sponsorship – work permit applications for musicians coming to the UK from outside the EU. I have a dedicated (messy) office, and love a job I can do in my pyjamas. I hit the office every morning before I even get into the kitchen to put on the coffee. I don’t have an endless commute, or regular nine-to-five hours.

But…

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My messy office

The phone can ring at any hour of the night or day. Someone has left it until the last minute and needs eleven Certificates of Sponsorship processing for a band from the USA who are already inbound to the UK on the New York to Heathrow flight, and the British tour manager has only just discovered they didn’t deal with immigration paperwork before they left. Or I get a call on a Sunday evening, at 7.00, from someone who asks if I process CoS for Mexicans. “Yes,” I say. “How long does it take?” he asks. “Well, I ask that you allow four weeks. How soon do you need them?” It turns out that he needs them within an hour because he has four Mexican musicians in a holding room at Heathrow airport because they tried to come into the UK totally unaware that they needed permission to work. If they don’t get their CoS within an hour they’re on the next plane back to Mexico. (Luckily Heathrow gave me a bit more time once they learned the application was in hand.)

So, ‘stuff happens’ is not just the outline of the middle section of my new book, it’s the laugh-track of my life.

Now, I don’t mind dealing with occasional emergencies, even if it means staying up until midnight or beyond, to make sure some poor souls don’t get deported instead of coming in to play a few gigs for their British promoter who has already sunk money into venue hire and promotion, but it does cut into my time.

And that brings me back to creativity.

sleepy 1

Waiting for the muse.

To be creative you don’t only need time to create, you need time to think about creating. Ninety percent of writing creativity happens in your brain, not when your fingers hit the keyboard. You have to make space for thinking, for daydreaming, for lollygagging in a comfy chair with a notebook which you might never open. The ideas are floating out there on the ether, you just need to open up your mind to let them in.

And I didn’t do enough of that before NaNoWriMo, which is why, when it came to the crunch, I wasn’t ready to write 50,000 new words in a month.

I need brain-space. I’ve had some of my best writing ideas while lying in bed trying to get to sleep, which is why I keep a notebook and pen on my bedside table.

Once I’ve opened up my mind to ideas,  the words flow, and when the words start flowing other words rush in to join them and… well… when I’m on a roll I’ve been known to write 10,000 words in a day. No, that kind of word-count doesn’t happen often, and I can’t keep up that pace for more than a day or three, but when it does happen it’s glorious. I generally consider 4,000 to 5,000 words a day excellent going, and that’s much more sustainable.

I’ve been on a couple of Milford writing retreats and I’m going again in June 2020. To be able to spend a full week without day-job interruptions or family obligations, or breaking off from what I’m doing to take my elderly mum to the supermarket, or put a meal on the table, is a wonderful experience. Of course a week isn’t long enough to write a book (though Catie Murphy wrote 33,000 words at the last Milford writing retreat) but it does get you off to a fine start, or a good middle, or a satisfying ending. (Note: there are still spaces on the Milford writing retreat 2020 at the time of writing this blog post.)

In addition I’ve decided to take the whole month of January off from the day job. Yes, there might still be the occasional emergency, the odd bunch of Mexicans stuck at Heathrow, but if I make it clear to my regulars that I’m not available in January, and if I can bear let the phone go to the answering machine, then I stand a good chance of getting some creative time. And I’m never open for day-job work between Christmas and New Year, usually because the house is full of family. This year, for various reasons, our kids can’t be with us at Christmas, so between the mulled wine and mince pies, and the Christmas Day Skype session, I can sit and daydream.

And that’s what I’m going to do.

 

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Process

I’ve been thinking about process over the last few weeks. I’m writing a new, story which I hope will turn into the next novel project. It’s as yet untitled, and if I had to describe it at all it would be to say that it’s a Robin-Hood-meets-aliens story, except that it’s not Robin Hood, they’re not quite aliens, and the ‘Sheriff of Nottingham’ character is female. I’ve written the set-up for both my main characters. I’ll probably end up changing names yet but I start off with a wild boy, raised by a hermit in the woods. He’s not a chosen one or anything like that. He chooses his own path, though not always very wisely. My second character is a female cavalry captain who finds herself at loggerheads with the king, so she’s posted to the back end of nowhere to quell local unrest… and it just happens to be close to where there’s a problem with alien incursions. And the stage is set for conflict.

I know (roughly) how the story is going to end, but now I’m looking at the middle bit. My whole plan for this is ‘stuff happens’. I’m beginning to work out exactly what. It has to increase the stakes and increase the tension. This is going to be fun.

I work in Scrivener, which is a wonderful programme for writers. It has three columns on screen. The middle column is a fairly standard word processor. The left hand column is the binder where you can display all your chapters and scenes. (I just use scenes until I’m near the end of the revisions before I divide it up into chapters.) You can move the scenes about by drag-and-drop in the binder. You can also keep research files, even photos in the additional files, and they are all accessible via the binder column, too. So you can access character files, places and place-names, plus any glossary you need, via the binder. The right hand scrivener column has an index card where you can outline the scene you are working one and with one flick of the mouse you can see these on the corkboard view (middle column again). Again this is great for ordering your scenes.

Scriv screencap

So I’m thinking that the next thing to do is to start planning the ‘stuff’ that ‘happens’ in Scrivener and see if it starts to hang together.

Inspiration doesn’t always hit me like a bucket of water. Sometimes it comes in drips, disordered drips, so excuse me while I do a mop-and-bucket act, collect all the drips and then splash them around in some semblance of order.

So what’s your process?

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It’s not too late to join up – NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo – National NovelWriting Month-takes place each November. You sign up Her: https://nanowrimo.org and commit to writing 50,000 in November, which means writing just a little under 2,000 words a day. It’s only 3rd November, you still have time to sign up if you want to.

They used to be pretty prescriptive about not starting your project until 1st November (though you could do as much prep as you wanted beforehand) but they’ve eased up on that.

If you have a writing project on the go and you want to pace yourself alongside other writers, it’s not too late to sign up. You’ve only missed (by the time this blog is published) four days.

Winterwood-Silverwolf-Rowankind

My first NaNo was 2008 when I added over 50,000 words of first draft to the novel that would eventually become Winterwood. I’ve used NaNo to pile word count on to projects-in-progress. I’ve added wordcount to Winterwood twice for different sections of the novel, Silverwolf, though not (suprisingly) Rowankind, the third in the Rowankind trilogy. From the Psi-Tech trilogy, I added word count to Nimbus, the final part.

Nimbus front coverI know other published authors who also use NaNo for adding words. My buddy Jaine Fenn is doing it this year, so I said I’d join her. I’m finding it difficult to transition into my writerly headspace, though. October was busy-busy with lots of day job (music industry) work and two consecutive weekend conventions taking me to Glasgow and Bristol. That’s possibly just an excuse because it’s Day 3 of NaNo (as I’m writing this) and so far I’ve written just 287 words on my current project, which already has 17,714 words written – most of the first act, in fact.

If I think of this book as a three act novel I’m probably ready to start the second act. I’ve talked before about the difference between pantsers and plotters. Pantsers write by the seat of their pants, i.e. to find out what happens. Let’s call it discovery writing. Plotters… well it’s just what it says on the tin. They work out what’s going to happen in advance and write out a detailed plot and then (if luck allows) they stick to that outline. Some writers outline chapter by chapter, or even scene by scene.

I usually know where the whole book is heading but my method is to write the opening, jot down what the ending will be, and that great gaping hole in the middle is covered by ‘stuff happens’.

Organised? Me?

So while The Amber Crown is with my agent and editor, I’m working on an untitled fantasy which I’m currently referring to Robin Hood Meet Aliens, though it’s not really Robin Hood, and they’re not really aliens.

So, over the years I’ve completed NaNo four times out of five and I’ve written 294,442 words in total. This year? Well, I’d better get my writing head on and sprint to catch up… after I’ve done those urgent day-job jobs, skyped my son in the USA and dealt with six buckets of apples from the tree in the garden. Procrastinating? Me?.

If you’re doing NaNo this year and you want to add me to your buddy list, I’m ‘artisan’ and my project is listed as Untitled Robin Hood Meets Aliens Novel.

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Retro-Blog of a Pre-published Writer from Autumn 2008

With hindsight this is really interesting. This (edited) collection of blog posts is from the early days of writing The Amber Crown, which then had the working title of Spider on the Web. (Sometimes the working title became That Bloody Baltic Novel.) I’d almost forgotten what this book looked like in its earlier incarnation. I’ve changed character names several times and refined the setting, but it’s still recognisably the same book, started so long ago, and then put on one side when I got my publishing deals for the Psi-Tech and Rowankind trilogies. I’m delighted to be able to go back to it. Spider on the Web became The Long Game before it became The Amber Crown. Hari became Marek and then Valdas. Lind stayed Lind. Miro became Mirza. The process is interesting.

Wheezing sucking noise as the Tardis whisks us back in time to 2008. Read on…

16th September 2008

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Idea borrowed from Warsaw via Pinterest for a scene in Chapter 2

I’ve done a bit more work on Spider on the Web, my potential next novel project, but I haven’t quite got the bit between my teeth yet and I keep bumping up against the problem of magic.

So far I have the first two chapters and part of a third (about 8k words altogether), plus a fourth that needs some revision because I’ve already made an emphasis shift since I wrote it. I’ve got three main viewpoint characters, Hari, Lind and Miro, and I’m intending that the VP be kept tightly focused (tight third) on each one in turn, giving them (probably) a short (2 – 3,000 word) chapter at a time. Only one of them – Miro, the third we meet chronologically and even then not until the fourth chapter – has any kind of magic. The other two don’t have much patience for it so it barely impinges on their consciousness.

I’m chasing myself round in circles at the moment. It’s my natural inclination to show that magic exists in this world earlier rather than later, but in order to do that I have to artificially insert some show-not-tell magic into either Hari or Lind’s first chapter which is essentially two sides of a successful assassination of Hari’s king by Lind, and the aftermath of same for each man. Magic just doesn’t fit there.

The earliest I would be comfortable bringing it in would be Chapter Three, Hari’s second chapter, by which time he’s on the run from the new king and for the first time realising that good as he was as an army officer, he’s become institutionalised and isn’t used to being on his own. So even if I bring in ‘country magic’ as a concept at this stage it won’t appear until about the 9,000 word mark. It will be closer to the 11,000 word mark if I wait until Miro’s chapter.

I’m really going to have to think hard about this. I may have to put the actual writing aside for a bit and go chew the plot over in a little more detail. I feel as though the focus is still a little off-centre.

[NOTE: I took it to Milford and the general consensus was that it should have a specific setting, not a generic fantasyland one, so I moved the action to a version of the Baltic Staes and Poland that never actually existed.]

4th November 2008

[NOTE: It’s NoMoWriMo time and I cleared the decks and paced myself alongside NaNo in order to add 50,000 words to the novel in the month of November.]

Red mente

Marek might wear a red mente like this one when in uniform

I’m starting to get reasonably comfortable with the not-quite-Poland setting for Spider on the Web, though every two minutes I’m flicking to Google to see if the Polish Cavalry used straight swords or sabres (it was sabres) and whether they had field artillery in the 1650s (they did). There’s an amazing amount of historical Polish stuff out there – especially on costume and equipment – much of it from reenactors. Some of the regiments look absolutely fantastic. (I take my kolpek off to you all, gentlemen and ladies.)

I am so going to have to run this whole thing by someone who speaks Polish, before I can let it loose anywhere in case I’ve made some howlers with names – especially if there are masculine and feminine versions of surnames. (Does anyone know?) The one advantage is that my city is quite cosmopolitan with Catholics, Muslims and Jews all welcome (Quite modern for 1650) so there’s a mixture of cultures and hopefully a mixture of names.

I’ve stuck to recognised religions and even mentioned far off countries like Italy, and advances in science such as those made by Kopernik but my map doesn’t look anything like anywhere in Europe.

This is a big experiment for me trying to mix real and imagined. I need just enough real to make the setting feel right but not too much that it ties it down.

5th November 2008

So what’s happened today?

Lind, who has more hangups than the average wardrobe (especially re sex, gender and orientation issues) has just persuaded the queen to strip off so he can dye her hair. (And she really doesn’t turn him on in the slightest.) All this so he can get her past a troop of Hussars who are looking for a copper-haired woman.

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Russian Royalty. The dead king’s sister?

He doesn’t actually know she’s the queen yet. He thinks she’s a high class lady fleeing her family’s wrath after becoming pregnant out of wedlock. For now he’s helping her to lay low because it’s in his own best interests. (He’d be just as quick to slit her throat and leave her in a ditch if that was in his better interests!)

What else?
Yesterday Marek finally stopped feeling sorry for himself and started to listen to his dreams, only he’s not so good at remembering them when he wakes. He’s about to leave the Koszaki host, turn round and go hurtling bull-neck back to Tel City, but Miro has the situation (and Marek) under control. She’s got her instructions – from the ghost of Marek’s assassinated King – and before he goes back to Tel City Marek has to pay a visit to the King’s sister. Like it or not, Miro’s going with him. Who else is going to make sure he stays on the right track and translates those dreams correctly?

8th November 2008

I managed to write the sex scene in which Miro gets laid at last. It’s not a love scene. She wants to lose her virginity, has finally found a man who isn’t scared off by the fact that she’s a witch and who isn’t horrified by the big port-wine stain (birthmark) all down one side of her face. It’s Marek, of course, who will enthusiastically shag anything in a skirt, but he’ll do it with good humour, good grace and good manners. Miro made an excellent choice and they’re going to stay good friends – albeit they’ll always be verbal sparring partners unless they’re actually horizontal.

Since this isn’t a relationship that’s going to last I’m not sure how long to let it run on for and how she’s going to tell him that she’s got what she wanted now back off and leave her alone. They are in each other’s company for the whole book, but not in a sexual way, I think. Marek is definitely going to meet up with Aniella again.

1st December 2008

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Winner’s Badge 2008

I hit my target 50,000 words for NaNoWriMo in the middle of the week and just decided to keep on going. Result? at 11.54 p.m. Sunday with 6 minutes to go to the finishing time I clocked up 62,081 words on Spider on the Web. I’m now on 71,027 words in total because I had the first two and a half chapters in the bag before I started. This is definitely the beginning of the end that I’m writing now. Maybe another 20,000 words and it will be finished. It’s unlike me to finish any novel in a mere 90,000 words, of course, but I live in hope.

[NOTE: The novel ended up at 163,000 words. So much for a 90,000 word novel!]

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Writers Injuring Characters

Toothache

Ouch.

I went to visit my dentist for a particularly difficult tooth extraction today, so as I write this I’m sitting nursing a sore jaw as the anaesthetic is wearing off. I can’t deny that I felt a bit wobbly after the extraction. Since the tooth had broken off below the gum line, it came out in pieces. No it didn’t hurt at the time, though obviously I could feel the pressure, and just knowing what was going on as the root came out in bits, was somewhat stressful. This is the first stage in having an implant to replace the tooth. It’s likely to be next March before I get a final replacement tooth. Luckily it’s not in a position that shows.

Anyhow I tell you my dental woes because it made me think of what we do to our characters in our books. We treat them appallingly and expect them to shrug off the pain and stand up and fight again. But it’s not so easy in real life.

stapled stomach

Not my surgery thank goodness.

I’m reminded of the do-it-yourself Caesarian Section in the 2012 movie Promethius. (Not seen it? I’d say, don’t bother, but your mileage may vary.) Basically our heroine, Elizabeth Shaw (played by Noomi Rapace) is pregnant with an alien offspring. Using an automated surgery table, she has the offspring cut out and her belly stapled back together. About five minutes later she’s using her arms to pull her own bodyweight up and over the lip of a doorway, and running like mad from a pursuing wheel-structure. Anyone who has ever had a hysterectomy, or any kind of surgery will tell you how improbable this is. You can’t even lift a kettle afterwards. Did it make the movie more exciting? It just made me wince because it was so unbelievable that it pulled me right out of the flow of the story.

And let’s not forget the number of times we’ve watched Hollywood westerns and detective stories where the villain knocks hero unconscious by the application of a gun butt to the back of the head. Any blow hard enough to cause unconsciousness, is going to cause other things, too… like concussion (and that’s no joke) memory problems, double vision, massive headache, debility etc. Here’s a link with some information.

So how do we damage our characters and make our stories thrilling without making the whole thing totally unbelievable? It helps to have a handy medical professional to ask, of course. I asked a GP friend where I could shoot someone and keep them functioning in the story. The short answer was the fleshy part of the upper arm, which is a bit limiting if you want to be really cruel to your character. He was also most insistent that knocking someone out with the barrel or butt of a gun, would likely immobilise your character for weeks (or maybe longer) with concussion – presuming it didn’t break their skull, cause internal bleeding and kill them. Hollywood tells lies. Who’d have thought it?

Bruise Day 2 to day 14

Yes this is me after tripping up and bashing my head on a stone step a few years ago. The pics chart the course of the bruise progression from Day 2 to Day 14. It looks evil, but I was lucky – no concussion.

The main thing to remember is to build in adequate recovery time.

I’ve recently been catching up with Peaky Blinders on Netflix, and have been impressed. When a character is hurt he stays hurt for an appropriate length of time, whether it’s a gunshot wound or a fractured skull. The main characters have recently returned home from the trenches of the Great War when the story opens, and there’s no doubt that they are suffering from PTSD, though the term hadn’t been invented then. Shell shock was the common term, but there were many different varieties of PTSD, most of which were not recognised at the time. The injuries in Peaky Blinders are not just physical – though there’s plenty of blood and gore. The main character, Tommy, sums it up when talking about the First World War. He says, ‘No one came back.’ Meaning no one came back the same as they were.

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Psi-Tech Trilogy

In my Psi-Tech trilogy one of my main characters, Ben Benjamin, is involved in an incident which almost kills him. It takes some time to get over it. In fact I’m not sure he does get over it completely, but he eventually learns to live with the fear that it could happen again at any time.

In the book that I’m currently working on, The Amber Crown, I have a character attacked. His injuries include a blow to the head which knock him insensible. It takes him weeks to recover.

Peaky Blinders gets round the recovery time issue by (sometimes) skipping forward with a ‘three months later’ caption. I found my character gentle things to do while he was recovering. In fact his recovery time adds to worldbuilding and also ties two character arcs together.

What are you going to do to your characters and how are they going to recover?

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Home from Milford – Tired but Happy

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A section of the delightful wall hanging by Eta Ingham Lawrie that decorates the main meeting room at Trigonos

I’ve just arrived home from Milford SF Writers’ Conference in North Wales, and I could sleep for a week. I’m not ready for the real world yet. After a week of intense writing critique punctuated by meals taken with fourteen other science fiction and fantasy writers, the real world seems a bit tame, even though I’ve come home to husband, dog, mother, and two lovely visitors.

Milford Group 01

The whole Milford 2019 group L to R: Steph Bianchini, Sue Oke, Mark Bilsborough, Mbozi (Tania) Haimbe, Russell Smith, Terry Jackman, Tiffani Angus, Sam Tovey, Tina Anghelatos, Kari Sperring, Jacey Bedford, Powder Thompson, Liz Williams, Victor Ocampo, and Pauline Dungate.

Fifteen science fiction and fantasy writers submitted close to 200,000 words between them – a total of twenty pieces, which we critiqued at the rate of four pieces per day. Critiquing is hard work. You have to read and evaluate, get your thoughts into some kind of sensible order, and deliver a verbal critique in not more than four minutes (after which you can send your written critique, often with extra notes, to the author). Four minutes doesn’t sound like long, but it’s plenty of time, especially since thirteen other writers also have to deliver their four-minutes-worth and the author has to have their say at the end. Each piece takes about an hour to critique. This is widely known as the Milford Method. We current Milford committee members (I’m secretary) can take no credit for inventing it because Milford began in 1956 in Milford Pennsylvania (started by Damon Knight) and was brought to the UK (to Milford on Sea) in 1972 by James Blish. It works as a method of keeping group critiques user-friendly. Critique is constructive and never directed at the writer personally, but at the piece of writing. Even the best piece of writing can be improved upon, and our intention is to make each piece the best it can possibly be.

Caernarfon 04

Russell Smith, Liz Williams and Victor Ocampo have captured Caernarfon Castle, and are now popping out for a nice cup of tea.

We had fabulous weather. After a little rain on the Sunday, the sun came out and bathed us in warmth for five days. We read, ate, critiqued the submitted pieces, went for walks in Trigonos’ lovely grounds, took photos of the delightful scenery, made time for a short trip into Caernarfon where Russell, Liz and Victor, captured the castle before lunch, then having done that popped out for a nice cup of tea.

On the Friday, crits finished for the week, we headed to Criccieth, schlepped up (and I mean UP) to the castle, then headed off to Dylan’s excellent fish restaurant for a leisurely lunch. For me, mackerel pate followed by a ‘small’ chowder and a sticky toffee pudding. I’d be afraid to see what size the large chowder is. The small one was enormous.

Then we took the opportunity to do a little retail therapy. The first craft shop I walked in to was lovely and I was just admiring some hand made cards when a voice from the counter said, “Jacey Bedford!”

“Yes,” I confessed.

Criccieth Castle 21

Criccieth Castle

It turns out that the lady (a silk artist) is an Artisan fan and also reads this blog. <Waves in the direction of Criccieth.> I was amazed. I never expect to be recognised. It’s only happened a few times before – and most of those in the USA, strangely enough. But it was really nice to find someone who listens to our music. The rest of the group was mightily impressed! Brian was really pleased when I told him.

You might have guessed I love going to Milford. It always gives me a tremendous boost of writerly enthusiasm. I make new friends, and learn about new markets for books and short stories (and pick up some gossip about the publishing world). I’m pretty sure that if it hadn’t been for a contact I made at Milford I would never have landed my first book on the right editor’s desk at the right time.

Milford 2020 still (at the time of writing) has a few places still open, and the application process for the Writers of Colour bursaries is open. There are application forms and details on the Milford website.

We open applications for Milford two years in advance, so you can book now for Milford 2020 and 2021, and also for the Milford Writers retreat in June 2020 and May 2021. The Writers’ Retreat is just what it sounds like. Held at Trigonos, you get a week, in glorious surroundings and without interruptions, to write to your heart’s content. And you get to meet up with other writers doing the same thing. It’s fab!

Crit room 02

Trigonos’ main meeting room, waiting for a critique session to start

Here’s a link to the Milford blog with a slightly different perspective and more pics.

And here’s the Milford website.

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Retro-Blog of a Pre-published Writer from March 2008

A few more interesting notes from my old blog. Long before I got my book deal I was working on Empire of Dust and Winterwood,  the books that were to become the first books in my two trilogies. At the same time I was looking for another agent. This is what I wrote then

March 4th 2008

The thing about being a musician’s-agent is that there are certain parallels to being a literary agent. Part of my [music] job is to gently turn people away from my door. I get more approaches from hopefuls than I can possibly deal with. A couple of weeks ago I’d had eight acts call me by lunchtime on Tuesday. It would be impossible to take on all of them–or any of them, for that matter–even though they are mostly excellent. So what makes an approach from one musician stand out above the rest? Why do I sometimes say yes to an act even though I know, strictly speaking, that I need another act on my books like a fish needs an umbrella? Maybe if I could figure that out, I could apply it to my own literary agent search, make my ‘package’ memorable–and no, I don’t mean perfumed pink paper and purple ink–and snag my agent of choice.

Unfortunately, more often than not, with musicians… it just depends what mood I’m in when a package lands on my doormat. I suspect it’s like that with literary agents too. However professional you are, there are some days when you’ll be more receptive to certain ideas than others. I’m sure I’ve turned down some winning acts… in fact I know I have. Right now it could be the Beatles’ reunion tour knocking on my door and I’d have to say no because I’m just too damn busy.

Writing the Breakout NovelSo next time I get a negative from a literary agent I’ll just remember it’s a lottery.

[HINDSIGHT NOTE: I did get a new agent and then she got out of agenting, so I got another agent with a big firm in NY. Then she left the firm and as a result my agent is now Donald Maass! Yes, THAT Donald Maass. Whoo-hoo!]

 

March 8th 2008

Trip to York. I met up with Sue and her best beloved for lunch at Cafe Concerto before going with Sue to what was supposed to be a NaNoWriMo get together in the cafe of York Art Gallery. All I can say is that I’m glad Sue was there because the three young women who turned up were pleasant enough but were either shy or…

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Winner’s Badge 2008

Why do people come to meetings if they don’t want to say anything? Why do people join NaNoWriMo if they aren’t passionate about writing? (Note: I don’t expect everyone to finish NaNo because it’s a hell of a thing to do, write 50k words in 30 days, but at least you should surely be interested in the writing process or else why are you signed up?) I think I’ve been spoiled by the level of commitment of Milford writers. Or… maybe the three quiet ones thought Sue and I were a couple of cackly crones who totally took over their  contemplative meet.

Oh well…

Empire of Dust

Empire of Dust – Cover

But one great thing was that, over lunch, S & R really helped to noodle a world-building glitch that had been troubling me in Empire of Dust. (Thanks, guys.)

Another good thing was that last night I started to read the first draft of the magic-pirate-adventure-quest novel that I did 50k words on under NaNo conditions last November, and having left it to mature for three months I actually found I was a) enjoying reading it and b) wanting to turn the next page because I’d semi-forgotten what happened next. This has to be A Good Thing. Of course the first draft is not quite complete yet. I have the final chapter to write. I intend to read through once and then write the last chapter. The outline (yes I actually wrote this one to an outline rather than my usual write-it-and-see mode) merely says: stuff happens and the good guys win.

This is the book I took to Milford in October 07 – then entitled The Elf-Oak Box – the one that got critted on International Talk Like a Pirate Day. At that point I only had 9k words, but now I have 78k and I reckon it will come in at about 85 – 90k when finished. That’s just about the shortest first draft I’ve even managed. (Longest being 240k which was ridiculous!) I think (and hope) that this one has legs.

 

9th March 2008

It must have been seeing Sue yesterday and going to the NaNoWriMo meeting, but I got a double dose of writerly enthusiasm. I redid the synopsis for of Empire of Dust. It doesn’t make a huge difference to the plot or the characters, but it does make a bit more pseudo-scientific sense in the storyline. (i.e. the technobabble is a little less unbelievable even though the science is still so soft it’s dripping off the bottom of the page).

Winterwood front cover

Winterwood by Jacey Bedford, published by DAW, Feb 2016.

So I got up at 8.00 this morning (an unheard of time for me, especially on a Sunday) to finish reading and start writing the last bit of the magic-pirate-adventure-quest novel. I’ve written 3k words so far today and worked out most of what’s going to happen in the stuff happens and the good guys win outline of the last two chapters.

In re-reading it I was amazed. It didn’t read like a first draft at all – especially a first draft done at the rate of 50k words in 21 days under NaNoWriMo conditions. (I did my 50k words in November even though I was away for a week!) In fact, I think the book might seriously have legs. I was gobsmacked. I’m not saying it’s deathless prose or anything, but it works better than something written so quickly has a right to.

It could even work as YA though the protag is 33 and it’s got a couple of f*cks in it (the word not the action) and also a couple of f*cks in it (the action not the word). Though they do happen on the page, they are not graphic. (BTW can I say f*ck without the net ghods stomping on me?) I think the protag being 33 is more of a contraindication than the f*cks for a YA these days.

[HINDSIGHT NOTE – it’s definitely NOT YA and the protag is 25.]

15th March 2008

The first draft of the magic-pirate-adventure-quest novel is in the bag. It’s come it at 87,700 words, less than 3k over my estimate and I’m really happy with it. I’m less happy with the title. At the moment it’s ‘The Elf-oak Box’, but I’m open to suggestions.

Whoo! I’m still grinning. I love typing: The End.

[HINDSIGHT NOTE: The Elf Oak Box eventually turned into Winterwood and came in at 133,000 words.]

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