The Truth in Historical Fantasy

Rowankind_cover 400My Rowankind trilogy: Winterwood, Silverwolf and Rowankind (all out now, published by DAW) is a fantasy set (mostly) in Britain in 1800, 1801 and 1802 respectively. It tells the story of Ross (Rossalinde) Tremayne, cross dressing privateer captain and witch, and Corwen Deverell, wolf shapechanger, plus an assorted cast of characters from the barely reformed pirates who crew Ross’ ship The Heart of Oak, to the gentle rowankind, and the magical creatures of the Okewood, as they battle against the suppression of magics.

Here’s the cover copy for Rowankind…

What do you do with a feral wolf shapechanger who won’t face up to his responsibilities? How do you contain magical creatures accidentally loosed into Britain’s countryside? How do you convince a crew of barely-reformed pirates to go straight when there’s smuggling to be done? How do you find a lost notebook full of deadly spells while keeping out of the clutches of its former owner? How do you mediate between a mad king and the seven lords of the Fae?

Ross and Corwen, she a witch and he a shapechanger, have several problems to solve but they all add up to the same thing. How do you make Britain safe for magic users?

It’s 1802. A tenuous peace with France is making everyone jumpy. The Fae, and therefore Ross and Corwen at their behest, have unfinished business with Mad King George, who may not be as mad as everyone thinks–or if he is, he’s mad in a magical way. The Fae have left mankind alone up to now because they don’t care to get involved with mortals, but don’t be fooled into thinking they’re harmless.

It’s a fantasy set firmly in our own history. There are real historical facts to ground the fantasy in reality. To my knowledge the Fae don’t exist and there are no gates to Iaru, their home, from anywhere in Britain, but my Rowankind series has a solid background in history.

Here’s what’s true.

Napoleon Bonaparte had been rampaging through Europe. Britain and France had been at war but in 1802 Henry Addington, who had recently taken over as First Minister from his friend and colleague, William Pitt the Younger, announced a peace. It didn’t last. Maybe no one expected it to, but it gave Britain (and France, too) a breathing space before hostilities recommenced in 1803.

The wheat harvest failed disastrously in 1800, leading to empty warehouses and the price of bread going up beyond what the poor could avoid, so yes, there were bread riots

GeorgeIIIKing George III was indeed mad, intermittently so at first, but his bouts of madness, which later led to the Regency, were not obvious in the period 1800 to 1802 (when my trilogy takes place). Scholars still argue over the exact cause of his affliction. Some say porphyria, others disagree, which gives me some wiggle room to say that His Majesty was adversely affected by his suppression of his own natural magic.

The Heart of Oak, Ross’ ship, is as real as I can make her. A two-masted tops’l schooner crafted from Bermuda teak, she’s an amalgamation of several existing vessels. The only thing ‘magical’ about her is that she has a sliver of magical winterwood spliced into her keel which means that Ross, seasick on every other vessel, can sail aboard the Heart without fear of illness.

HMSPicklereplicaShips. Some of the ships I mention are real ships, including the Guillaume Tell, captured from the French during the wars and brought into the Royal Navy Fleet. The Bermuda sloop, The HMS Pickle, a tops’l schooner like the Heart of Oak, under Captain John Richard Lapenotière, was a real Royal Navy ship, originally called Sting and renamed Pickle in 1801. A few years later she would have the task of carrying the news of Nelson’s victory at Trafalgar home to Britain. The Royal Navy still holds ‘Pickle Nights’ in commemoration. The above photo is of a replica of the Pickle.

The Spanish Armada was thoroughly defeated by bad weather after the battle with English ships in the channel in 1588. Who’s to say that the storms were not magically created?

Sir Francis Walsingham was understood to be Queen Elizabeth’s spymaster, so who else would she have trusted to make a magical problem disappear?

Harris_covent_garden_ladiesLondon, is as close as I can make it to the developing city of that time. I used (mainly) a very detailed map dated 1806 and researched a lot of Victorian photographs which showed old buildings obviously extant in 1800-1802. Georgian houses were being built to a plan that is still well known today with servants’ offices in the basement, elegant rooms upstairs, family bedrooms above those and cramped bedrooms for servants in the attics. Hansom cabs were a thing of the future, but Hackney coaches were common. You could buy anything from a steak dinner to a prostitute, and if you wanted the latter Harris’s List of Covent Garden Ladies gave you a list of who was available and what their specialities were.

Wapping old stairs - thenWapping Old Stairs are still there, as is the Town of Ramsgate public house. The stairs are tucked away down by the side of the Town of Ramsgate. When the tide is high, the foot of the stair is completely submerged, but at low tide you can step out on to the mud banks of the Thames.I have Victorian photographs as well as more modern ones.

Vauxhall Stair is the access from the Thames through to Vauxhall Gardens. There was a vinegar factory nearby which must have made the air very pungent.

The White Lion was an actual pub, close by Vauxhall Stair. It’s likely revellers heading for Vauxhall Gardens would have had to pass by on their way from the Thames.

Old London Bridge - Turner 1796

London Bridge – the old medieval one 1209 to 1831 had been cleared of all the bridge-top buildings by the time the Rowankind trilogy takes place. This is a painting by Turner from approximately 1796, so close enough for the Rowankind trilogy which starts in 1800. One of the arches had been widened to allow safer passage beneath the bridge, but the remaining arches were narrowed by the boat-shaped ‘starlings’, that protected the bridge piers. The pressure of water flowing through the starlings, especially on an outgoing tide caused turbulent through-ways and boats going under the arches were said to ‘shoot the bridge’. Cautious passengers alighted before the bridge and walked round to meet their intrepid boatmen on the other side.

Vauxhall Gardens

Vauxhall Gardens was largely as described with allowances made for the fact that I have used it out of season, with added hell hounds. The season was relatively short, given British weather, so it was closed up from autumn through to the following spring.

Frogmore, close by Windsor Castle, was the house King George III renovated and enlarged for his wife and unmarried daughters. At the time this story takes place, renovations would have been underway.

Barnsley in South Yorkshire, is as close as I can make it to the town of that period with its linen weaving and its wire drawing workshops. (Coal mininghad not yet become its major industry.) I used the closest maps I could find for the period, but I grew up there and the street layout in the centre of town in 1801 was remarkably close to the Barnsley I remember, before the town planners fatally messed it about in the early 1970s.

Cannon HallDenby House exists, or rather the pattern for it does. Cannon Hall, only a few miles friom where I live, was once a gentleman’s residence and is now a museum owned and run by Barnsley Council. You can go and see it (it’s free) and see the lake where Corwen’s brother Freddie acquired his fear of water. (There’s also a nice garden centre and café opposite the main car park where you can get excellent lunches or coffee and cake.)

Deverell’s Mill is an amalgamation of typical Yorkshire West Riding woollen and worsted mills of the day. In 1800/1802 the industrial revolution had started, but steam engines were still in their infancy and mills relied on water power. Some of the machinery developed for cotton spinning and weaving was being adapted for wool. Child labour was the norm and a mill owner, such as Old Mr. Deverell,  who would not employ children under ten, would have been considered benevolent.

Weymouth and sea dipping. George III used to prefer being dipped in the sea at either Weymouth or Bognor (while his son, the prince, used to prefer Brighthelmstone, later Brighton). To be dipped in the sea the king entered his wooden bathing machine (which was, indeed painted red, white and blue with a flagpole on the top). The machine was then wheeled to the water and the king emerged from door on the seaward side (possibly naked) to be ‘dipped’ by a pair of ‘dipping ladies’ experienced in the art of not letting their patients drown. The first time George III was dipped at Weymouth a band followed his bathing machine down the beach playing God Save the King and his dipping ladies had GSTK woven into their girdles. Dipping was all for the good of the king’s health, of course. Part of the ‘cure’ was also drinking seawater mixed with milk. Ugh! When sea bathing first became popular it was common for men to swim naked.

House of Commons 1808Parliament. This, of course, is the old Parliament building before the disastrous fire at Westminster that caused the rebuilding later in the century. I’ve used contemporary accounts to describe it, though I’ve taken a bit of a liberty by installing a proper public gallery, which did not exist. Ladies were not allowed to observe until 1837, hence the need for a little magic to make sure Ross and Lily see the important proceedings. The above engraving of the House of Commons is from 1808.

William Pitt the Younger was George III’s first minister, but resigned over the Irish question early in 1802 to be replaced by his colleague Henry Addington. Addington was largely concerned in securing a peace with France. Pitt became First Minister again in 1803.

Henry Addington’s tenure as First Minister was short. He did, indeed, live at the White Lodge in Richmond Park.

sutton pool mapHistorical Plymouth. Sutton Pool is still there today, a harbour (now full of pleasure boats) beneath the impressive walls of the Citadel, close to the Mayflower Steps. I had to work out what Vauxhall Quay might have been like in 1800, plus the ramshackle warehouses on the opposite side of the pool. I found some maps of the area in the correct time period, plus Victorian photographs which clearly showed houses from the Elizabethan and georgian eras. I used those to work out what Plymouth in 1800 would have looked like. The newly built Guildhall had recently replaced the old medieval one. The Ratcatchers Inn almost certainly did not exist, but it could have done because Southside (the street) definitely did. The market was marked on the map, but the street where Ross’ family home is situated is entirely fictional and situated right on the edge of the building line as it then was, close to Portland Square.

Ross Trenayne 4Fashion for men and women. Since neither Rossalinde nor Corwen are beloved of the ‘ton’ (society’s elite of the day) I can avoid high society balls and activities, and therefore not worry too much about everyone being dressed in the absolute pink of fashion. Both my main characters wear practical clothes, which may be a few years old, so a couple of years behind the trend. Hookey, when he becomes Captain of the Heart of Oak, favours a slightly out-of-date frock coat which he thinks makes him look more dashing. I found as lot of costume information on Pinterest and also visited the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Fashion Museum in Bath to see real garments up close. Ross would have scandalised polite society dressed in men’s clothing.

I disappeared down many google-rabbit-holes while researching all this and I now have more books on Georgian history than I really need – though – can you ever have too many books? My Pinterest pages carry a lot of photographs I used for reference, from costume to buildings geography. Feel free to take a look. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/birdsedge/

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What I Like to Read, and Why

Though I have a large collection of paper books, some of them from my childhood, I mostly read fiction on Kindle these days. It’s not that I prefer electronic to dead tree books, but books are books and it’s the content that matters to me, not the form. Yes, who doesn’t love a first edition in a gorgeously crafted leather binding, but when it comes to practicalities, I can read my Kindle Paperwhite in the dark, I can make the print bigger when my eyes get tired, and I can carry around 676 (current count) books in my handbag, just like Hermione. And that’s only my current Kindle. I still have (probably) twice as many on my ancient Kindle Keyboard.

I devour books, I always have. There’s never a time when I don’t have a novel on the go. Sometimes (especially if I’m busy writing) my reading slows down, but it never stops. When I first started writing in earnest, I never used to be able to read fiction while I was incubating a book. Then I reached the stage where I could read fiction as long as it was a different genre; fantasy or historical while I was writing science fiction, and science fiction while I was writing historical fantasy.

And, yes, the short answer is that I mostly read genre fiction: science fiction, fantasy, and historical fiction, with a very small smattering of general fiction.

Now I’ve achieved equilibrium. I can read while I’m deeply engrossed in writing, which is good because a writer should keep reading what’s out there. It wouldn’t do to reinvent the wheel, or to write something with a theme too close to something that’s trending. Yes, I know Twilight, and possibly the True Blood/Sookie Stackhouse series, encouraged a proliferation of vampire novels, and Hunger Games heralded the arrival of the dystopian teen tale. While we’re at it, I’m sad to see so many heroine-pulled-back-in-time-to-meet-handsome-Scottish-laird books since Outlander became so popular. Some are well-written, of course, and enjoyable to read, but finding a new take on a popular theme is bloody difficult.

Of course, you never know what the next big thing will be. Who’d have thought that stories about a boy in a school for witchcraft and wizardry would ever become such a popular and lasting phenomenon? The next big thing has been written already and is somewhere in the publishers’ pipeline. The publishing process is so longwinded that by the time you read the next big thing, it’s been undergoing the creative and publishing process for three or four years (or more), so the next big thing is already the last big thing.

In the meantime write what sets your heart on fire now.

And read widely.

I’m currently halfway through the second of Sebastien de Castell’s Greatcoat books. There are so many books and so little time that I rarely read a whole series consecutively, but I so loved Traitor’s Blade that I went on to read Knight’s Shadow immediately and I bought books three and four (Saint’s Blood and Tyrant’s Throne) and downloaded them to kindle, ready. [*Edit: I’ve finished all four now, and love them all equally.]

de castell

What do I like about them? They are violent. Some have called them ‘Grimdark’ but I’m not so sure I would pigeonhole them quite like that, even though they have a high body-count. King of Grimdark, Joe Abercrombie’s First Law trilogy, is much darker, though, like the Greatcoats books it has a delicious streak of black humour. I don’t think I’m meant to like the unlikeable characters in First Law, though I find I do sympathise with both Glokta (the torturer) and Logen Ninefingers (the berserker). However, I really like the characters in the Greatcoats books. Falcio val Mond, once the First Cantor of the Greatcoats, has spent the last five years trying to live the dream of his dead king. Greatcoats were created to be the travelling magistrates, trained in the law and the arts of fighting, but the king was assassinated by power-hungry dukes and the Greatcoats disbanded and discredited. Falcio, however is still a Greatcoat in his heart and mind. Accompanied by his two best friends, Greatcoats Brasti and Kest he’s still following the king’s last order. Needless to say, it gets him into trouble more times than I can count. Falcio is easy to like. Brasti is a handsome womaniser, a bit thick, but a phenomenal archer, Kest is measured and thoughtful, the best swordsman in the country, and Falcio is supposed to be the brains of the trio. He’s loyal, brave, and tries to be honourable and fair. He doesn’t always get it right, but oh how he tries. Once he’s committed to something, he won’t give up, no matter how the odds are stacked against him. The trio’s dry and irreverent sense of humour leads to great banter and witty/sarcastic asides that lighten the mood. The trio understand each other, almost too well. At one point one of them remarks something like: ‘We should be married. We’ll be finishing off each other’s sentences next.’ Indeed there’s a great three-way bromance going on, though no one would want to admit it. I’m only halfway through the second book and already the author has done terrible things to his characters and put them into impossible situations. I’m looking forward to reading about more impossible situations. When Game of Thrones has finished, HBO could do a lot worse than look at the Greatcoats.

Curse of ChalionI like great characters in impossible situations. I like to like the characters I read about, or at least find some empathy for them, and know why they do what they do. Maybe I even like to fall in love (a little) with them. How can anyone not fall in love with Cazaril from Lois McMaster Bujold’s excellent The Curse of Chalion? Caz is resilient, steadfast and clever. He’s a broken man when the book opens, and as he rebuilds himself, he rebuilds the lives of the people around him. Sacrificing himself, if it’s the only way. And the wonderful thing about him is that he doesn’t think he’s anyone special. He simply does what he knows he has to do, even when it scares him spitless. (And now I’ve made myself want to go and re-read Curse of Chalion again – for about the sixth time.)

I blog all the books I read and the movies I see here on my Dreamwidth blog. I’m not a professional academic reviewer. I blog to remind myself of what I’ve read and why I liked it (or didn’t). There’s a decade of my reading on there, mostly spoiler free. Go take a look.

If you like a book, or even if you don’t, blog about it, tweet about it, stick it on Facebook, or Instagram, or whatever the latest social media platform is. Your thoughts are the oxygen by which books (and therefore authors) breathe.

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Write What You Know – Kind Of…

I nearly died.

It was a few years ago, before I got my first book deal, but I was already a writer, if not a published one. I had an anaphylactic reaction, and it happened like this. I developed a sore throat so my doctor prescribed an antibiotic which I’d taken (safely) many times before. I arrived back home from visiting the surgery, took the first tablet and…wooo… started to feel funny, slightly queasy and just… not right. Then my palms started to itch in that way that said this was an allergic reaction. Luckily my husband was at home. He took one look at me and called the doc, then bundled me into the car. The doc was ready and waiting at the surgery. They laid me out on a couch in the doc’s office and I dimly recall him telling the practice nurse to come in and watch because she might never see something like this again, but she needed to know what to do if she did.

My husband tells me that by this time I had blue lips and the rest of me was actually turning green, especially my ears for some weird reason. There were lumps the size of eggs coming up along my arms, going down again and coming up again in a different place, like I was playing host to an alien under my skin. I wasn’t in pain, just feeling extremely strange and my breathing was laboured (throat swelling closed, but I didn’t know that at the time). I wasn’t scared, in fact I was strangely not-scared even though I knew this was serious. In quick succession the doc injected adrenaline, antihistamine (Piriton), and when that didn’t seem to be working quickly enough, followed it up with a steroid shot. All this while the emergency ambulance was on its way.

Once in the ambulance and heading for the nearest hospital, eight miles away, with the siren going and the blue flashing light, I started to shake. Great, uncontrollable shudders starting in my toes and rolling up my body to my head, one after the other in waves.

Hospital lightsBy the time we reached the hospital the injections the doc had given me were starting to take effect. I was admitted overnight for observation, but the worst was over. As I was being wheeled to the ward, lying flat on my back on a trolley-bed, I saw the corridor lights flashing over my head, whoosh whoosh whoosh, just like they do in the movies. It felt kind of clichéd, but even while it was happening, I was thinking: remember all this; one day you’ll be able to use it in a book.

They say write what you know.

They don’t, of course, say write only what you know. We are all the sum of our experiences and as writers we should use those experiences to enrich and enliven our narrative.

Imagination is hugely important, but if you want it to feel real, combine imagination with experience. I’ve never fought in a battle or taken part in a cavalry charge, but I have

  1. Jacey on Justiceridden horses and mucked about in stables;
  2. kept German Shepherds;
  3. had two babies (not simultaneously);
  4. dislocated my shoulder (which is painful and hurts like hell but not in the place you expect it to hurt);
  5. run a village post office;
  6. tripped and bashed open my head (8 stitches), which gave me two wonderful black eyes and a permanent scar. Not one of my finer moments;
  7. been a librarian;
  8. broken my wrist;
  9. travelled the country selling stuff at craft fairs;
  10. been badly bitten by a dog. Note: don’t pull away when a big dog has his teeth in your wrist or it does more damage. Push instead. Dogs’ teeth are designed for tearing – don’t give it the opportunity;
  11. had a nasty leg wound which took months to heal and has left a large scar like a shark bite. I won’t show the pics of that in case you’re trying to eat food while reading this;
  12. given emergency first aid when my husband bashed open his head/gouged his finger to the bone/trapped his hand in a car door. (Not all at the same time, but he does DIY, what can I say?);
      Jacey Bedford. Memeber of Artisan a cappella trio.
  13. stood up against someone potentially dangerous for something I believed in under difficult circumstances (that’s a long story for another time);
  14. stood on a large outdoor stage and sung to twenty thousand people as part of Artisan – an a cappella trio;
  15. Sung to three people and the landlord’s dog in a pub in Kent in a snowstorm. (It’s not all rock and roll and big festival audiences.);
  16. spent a lot of time in recording studios – 12 CDs – and radio stations;
  17. had my own (short) a cappella music series on BBC Radio2
  18. played host to a lot of touring musicians;
  19. renovated an old house;
  20. done family history and local history research;
  21. had someone drill into my jaw bone, not to implant a spying device or a poisoned tooth, but I guess it felt the same.
  22. travelled many times to Canada and the USA. Also to Germany, Belgium, and Australia (via Hong Kong)

None of these things in themselves would make particularly good reading (except maybe number thirteen), but using the experiences in the right place in your narrative would certainly help to make it real.

Of course, I don’t want to have a Mary Sue character, so I’m not putting myself into my books, just using my experiences and writing what I know.

Cherish your experiences, the good and the bad. Use the feelings, if not the actual event, to make your narrative feel real.

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Updated Blog Archive: 2013 to 2018

2013

  1. Bated Breath
  2. Seven Short Men and a Waif
  3. Preparing for Milford
  4. Jumping in at the Shallow End
  5. Serendipitous Book Browsing
  6. Four days to go
  7. Three Book Deal
  8. Milford Writers
  9. Publishers Marketplace Announcement
  10. Editor Talk
  11. New Book Log on LJ: Karen Traviss: Star Wars: Clone Wars – No Prisoners:
  12. World Fantasy Con
  13. That Difficult Second Novel
  14. Revision – First Pass
  15. Wordle
  16. Wordcount
  17. Timelines

 

2014

  1. Book Blog Roundup for 2013
  2. Thinking about Images
  3. Title News
  4. SFWA
  5. Scrivening
  6. Character self-determination
  7. Jacey’s Eastercon Panel Schedule
  8. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction
  9. More Book Logging Over on T’Other Blog
  10. Amazin’ Amazon
  11. Empire of Dust
  12. Guest Blog 1: Ben Jeapes – Infinite diversity in infinite combinations
  13. Writers Blog Tour
  14. Guest Blog 2: Gaie Sebold – How (Not) To Write A Steampunk Novel
  15. My Loncon Schedule – Provisional
  16. First Draft – Progress Report
  17. The Loneliness of the Long Distance Panda
  18. How long is a novel?
  19. Editing and Time Travel
  20. My Updated Loncon-3 Schedule
  21. August, Cons, Page Proofs and Milford
  22. Write What You Know
  23. Why I love my cover for Empire of Dust
  24. Submitting what you write
  25. It’s real
  26. My Guest Post on Ruth Booth’s Blog
  27. My Guest Post on the Bristol Books Blog
  28. My Guest Post on Ben Jeapes’ Blog
  29. Milford 2014
  30. Guest Post on Deborah Walker’s Blog
  31. Bristolcon Schedule
  32. Guest Post on Gaie Sebold’s Blog
  33. The Goodreads Odd Choice Awards
  34. Happy Book Day To Me
  35. Guest Post on Anne Lyle’s Blog
  36. Guest Post on Chuck Wendig’s Terrible Minds Blog
  37. Guest Post on Book View Cafe
  38. The Three Letter Word
  39. Guest Interview on Diabolical plots
  40. Order Books For the Holidays
  41. Interstellar
  42. Mind melding
  43. Guest Blogs Roundup
  44. Listed
  45. Nuts and Bolts of Writing #1
  46. Interview and book discussion
  47. Katharine Kerr needs our help.

 

2015

  1. 2014 – Looking Backwards and Forwards – 2015
  2. Short story Sales 2015
  3. Selling Short Stories
  4. Another short story sale
  5. Listen to Good Advice, but Trust Yourself
  6. How to Create Multi-Dimensional Characters—Everybody Lies (Kristen Lamb)
  7. Jacey Bedford Answers Ten Questions
  8. Ten Books I Couldn’t Put Down
  9. Ten Favourite Children’s Books
  10. Lonely Panda Reprinted Again
  11. Published Today: Last Train
  12. Crossways Cover Reveal
  13. Stars in your Reviews – The Goodreads Conundrum
  14. Goodreads Starry Update
  15. Eastercon Schedule 2015
  16. Goodbye Sir Terry
  17. Pelquin’s Comet: What’s It All About?
  18. Lost in Translation
  19. Selling Stories
  20. Attending Eastercon – Dysprosium 2015
  21. Short Story Roundup
  22. Eastercon 2015
  23. On Delivering the Second Book
  24. SFSF Social #3 – 27th June 2015
  25. Crossways – the Process
  26. More Short Stories Available Online
  27. Book Blog and Pinterest
  28. Two Worlds Collide: Guest Bloggage from Terry Jackman
  29. Re-reading my own book: Winterwood.
  30. My First Writing Rewards
  31. View From a Hotel Window, 5/26/15 + Thoughts on the Deal Money  (John Scalzi)
  32. Another Country
  33. Sheffield SF Social
  34. SFSF Social – June Report
  35. Science for Fiction Writers
  36. Book Cover: Crossways
  37. New Two-Book Deal
  38. CROSSWAYS is OUT TODAY!
  39. Winterwood Edits
  40. New Series of Guest Posts
  41. Guest Blog: Ian Creasey answers five questions about his writing
  42. Guest Blog:Tony Ballantyne tells us about his writing.
  43. Another Successful Milford
  44. Publishing progress
  45. Winterwood Page Proofs
  46. Agents and Publishing
  47. Fantasycon 2015
  48. What has NaNoWriMo Ever Done for Us?
  49. Winterwood Cover Revealed at Fantasy Book Cafe
  50. Gail Z Martin – Five Questions – Guest Post
  51. Winterwood Cover Reveal
  52. Christmas is Coming
  53. So Many Books, So Little Time.
  54. You never get Blasé About… a Good Review
  55. What did I say about good reviews?
  56. Guest Blog: Toby Venables Answers Five Questions
  57. My Writing Year – 2015
  58. My Reading Year 2015

 

2016

  1. Fan mail
  2. Happy Book Day To Me: Winterwood Published Today
  3. Winterwood Interviews and Reviews
  4. More Post-Winterwood News, Interviews and Reviews
  5. Winterwood Cover
  6. About Literary Agents and How to Get One #1
  7. About Literary Agents and How to Get One #2
  8. Looking forward to Eastercon / Mancunicon
  9. Details Details
  10. Science for Fiction Writers 2016
  11. Silverwolf
  12. Humour in Fantasy and SF
  13. Gotten, Tannoy, and Trug
  14. Thoughts on Editing
  15. Silverwolf Cover Reveal
  16. Editing Anthologies – A Guest Post by Joshua Palmatier
  17. Milford 2016
  18. Fantasycon-By-The-Sea, 2016
  19. What’s in a name?
  20. Guest Blog from Gail Z Martin in Praise of Halloween
  21. Pitfalls of Publishing, or Lest I Forget
  22. Overnight Success in Only Sixteen Years
  23. The Yin and Yang of Writing Advice
  24. My Reading Year 2016

 

2017

  1. Silverwolf
  2. Ten Quick Tips for Writers
  3. Style Sheets
  4. Agent Update
  5. Bloggage or not…
  6. Stories Far and Near
  7. Write What Someone Knows by Ben Jeapes
  8. Cover Reveal: Nimbus
  9. Committing Trilogy
  10. Worldbuilding for a Series
  11. Due Process
  12. Some Random Thoughts on Revisions and Edits
  13. Life, Death and the Writer’s Pen
  14. Ambition and Poison – a Guest Blog by Gail Z. Martin
  15. History Lends Perspective
  16. Corwen Silverwolf Speaks
  17. Bladdered or Shitfaced? The gentle art of word choice and the bogglement of page-proofing.

 

2018

  1. What’s the Psi-Tech trilogy about?
  2. Discovering what I didn’t know I didn’t know.
  3. Beginning at the Beginning
  4. How to get a literary agent
  5. Pleasantly Pleasing Progress
  6. My Eastercon Schedule
  7. Men in Science Fiction and Fantasy
  8. The Gift That Keeps on Giving
  9. Cover Reveal Rowankind
  10. The Reading Conundrum
  11. Rowankind Delivered
  12. What times we’ve lived through
  13. Make me Immortal with a Kiss
  14. Writing New Series Vs. Sequels – A guest blog by Gail Z. Martin
  15. Character self-determination
  16. Dropping a Pebble in the Pond
  17. Book Covers
  18. Jaine Fenn Guest Blog
  19. Finish What You Start – Or Don’t
  20. Guest Blog From Joshua Palmatier
  21. My Week at Milford
  22. Gentleman Jim Speaks Out
  23. SF Conventions and How to Survive Them
  24. Winterwood Chapter One – Read it Here
  25. Interrogate Your World – Worldbuilding Questions for Writers
  26. Jacey’s Quick Book Links
  27. Guest Blog. Peter Sutton Answers Five Questions
  28. Happy Book Day to Me (Rowankind)
  29. Busy November 
  30. My 2018 Reading
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It’s never too late to talk about a book

Unless you are lucky enough to live in a city which has good bookshops, or even better, specialist science fiction and fantasy bookshops, your browsing of new SFF titles may be limited. My little local bookshop sadly closed last year, but the owner only had one shelf of SFF, and played it safe with Terry Pratchett and George R.R. Martin. I can’t blame him, but neither could I go and browse there and buy the books I wanted to read. (Of course if I knew what I wanted, he could order books for me, but how do I find new books by new authors unless I spot them on bookshop shelves?)

So I’m left ‘browsing’ via the big shop named after a South American river, and as we all know, what comes up when you do a search largely depends on algorithms.

Or I can find out about books by word of mouth.

Never underestimate what word of mouth can do.

If you love a book, blog about it, review it on Amazon, or review it on Goodreads. Tweet about it. Put something on Facebook or Instagram. Or simply tell your friends.

Nimbus front coverNot just my books, of course, though I’ll be eternally grateful if you do.

I’ve been book blogging since 2009, here on my Dreamwidth blog: https://jacey.dreamwidth.org/

I don’t always like everything I read, but I try to blog about good points as well as bad. My book blog is an instant reminder of everything I’ve read in the last decade, and oh how I wish I’d started earlier. Books recently read and enjoyed include Stephanie Burgis’ Thornbound, Suzanne Palmer’s Finder, Gaie Sebold’s Shanghai Sparrow, and T Kingfisher’s Swordheart. As I’m writing this I’m in the middle of reading Jaine Fenn’s upcoming book Broken Shadow and by the time you go and look at by blog, I’ll probably have reviewed it.

So what are you waiting for? If you’ve read my books, please shout about them. If you haven’t, read them and shout about them. They are all published by DAW, in print, and available on both sides of the Atlantic. (Though not on Kindle in the UK, only as paper books.)

Or read and shout out about any books you love. Go on. You know you want to. Authors often work in a vacuum, they love hearing that you’ve enjoyed their books.

Rowankind_coverAwards Season
As a reminder I have two novels eligible for awards this season, that’s Nimbus, the third in the Psi-Tech trilogy, and Rowankind, the third in the Rowankind trilogy. Both were published in 2018. And since both trilogies completed in 2018, the trilogies are eligible in the new Hugo category for series. I also have a short story eligible and that’s Make Me Immortal With a Kiss’ in the anthology SECOND ROUND, edited by Joshua Palmatier and Patricia Bray, and published by Zombies Need Brains press. I happen to think it’s one of the best short stories I’ve written. If you do, please give it a plug.

I’m not begging or anything, just saying…

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Writing Romance When You’re Not a Romance Writer – a post for Valentines Day

I don’t write romance as a genre, but my books have love and relationships (and sex) in them because they’re about life and that sort of thing happens, a lot—not always when or how we expect it to happen. In fact it sometimes sneaks up on us when we’re not looking. Because it’s Valentine’s Day on Thursday, here are the romantic bits from my two trilogies. How the two main characters met and fell in love, told from the point of view of my two (female) protagonists. Of course, a lot more happens besides romance, but that’s not what this post is about.

3bookpsitech

The Psi-Tech Trilogy – Cara Carlinni speaks.
I was on the run. I spotted Ben Benjamin in a spacers’ bar on Miramar 14 station. There was a bit of a ruckus and Benjamin came out on top, but he didn’t lose his temper. Instead he defused a situation that could have become thoroughly nasty in a somebody-dies kinda way. I can work with that, I thought, especially since he flies his own ship and I need a way out of here. So I stepped in and gave the right kind of signals and pretty soon we were out of the bar and heading for his room. That’s when I made my first mistake. I got it wrong. I figured he was the kind of man who wouldn’t dump someone he’s just had sex with in the deep shit. (Unlike my previous lover who had been exactly that kind of man.) In fact, Ben wouldn’t dump anyone in the deep shit unless they thoroughly deserved it. By the time I realised that it was too late. Don’t get me wrong, sex with Benjamin was OK, at least, not gross or anything, but my emotions simply weren’t in it. I thought I could fool him about that. Second mistake. The guy was perceptive. Let me cut a long story short… He smuggled me off the station, and even though we’d had a bad start, he didn’t try to jump my bones again. I think I began to be a little bit in love with him when we didn’t have sex. Hmmm, maybe love is a bit too strong a word. We became friends, I think. Benjamin’s an easy man to like. Okay, I admit to being a little bit in love with him, but not the kind of love which wouldn’t let me walk away if I needed to. He passed me off as his wife for a time (and still no sex) and we ended up on a planet called Olyanda, trying to protect a colony from our ruthless bosses who wanted the planet’s platinum and were prepared to dispose of the settlers to get it. Loving Benjamin kinda crept up on me. I had trust issues, bigtime, since by this time my previous lover was out to get me and I knew it. Benjamin stood by me. There’s nothing that says I love you more than the act of killing a bad guy to save your life. And the sex? It took a while to get around to it, but it was worth the wait.

Winterwood-Silverwolf-Rowankind

The Rowankind Trilogy – Ross Tremayne speaks
The first time I met Corwen doesn’t count because he was in wolf form. My brother, David, my very able seaman, Hookey Garrity, and I were trying to stay ahead of a troop of redcoats by taking a shortcut through the enchanted Okewood, home of the Green Man and his Lady of the Forest. She sent her silver wolf to lead us back to the Bideford road, and I discovered he had a sense of humour, especially where Hookey’s horsemanship (or lack of it) was concerned. The next time our paths crossed was in a respectable inn in Plymouth. He was wholly human then, tall with a pleasing countenance, ice grey eyes and silver hair, a colour, not an indicator of age. I wasn’t looking for love. I was a widow, dammit, and the ghost of my first husband, Will, was still with me, sometimes as no more than a whisper on the wind, sometimes looking solid enough to be a real man. When Corwen kept appearing in places were I had business, I began to get suspicious. These were no casual encounters. I wondered whether he was an agent of the Mysterium, but if that were the case he would simply have had me arrested for the unregistered witch that I was. When David and I escaped from a burning warehouse by jumping into the murky waters of Sutton Pool, it was Corwen who dragged us out of the water and got us back to our inn. I still didn’t trust him, not really, but I was grateful for the shoulder to lean on regardless, and by that time I’d realised he wasn’t going to give us away to the Mysterium—though I didn’t know who he was working for. To be honest I never expected the Lady of the Forest to take an interest in me and mine, or to send her watch-wolf. I did play a dirty trick on Corwen, my last one, I promise. He followed me aboard my ship, the Heart of Oak, and explained things a little more. I was still determined not to allow him to interfere, so I had him chained up belowdecks while David and I put ashore to search for our long lost family. I told Hookey to keep Corwen and let him go far away where he couldn’t interfere. But the man is persistent, I’ll give him that. Corwen escaped and eventually caught up with us. I suddenly realised that I was glad to see him. I’ve been glad every day since. Will’s ghost was not so glad, but that’s a story for another day.

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Writing the First World War

Maybe it was the centenary and all the remembrance services, but for the last few years I’ve had the First World War on my mind—not every waking moment, you understand, or my brain would be dribbling out through my ears by now, but enough that I’ve ended up with three short stories in anthologies.

And, of course, because I write science fiction and fantasy (mostly) there’s a SFF element to all three stories.

thomas bennettMy grandfather, Tommy Bennett (left), fought in the conflict, a volunteer in 1914, he went all the way to Pontefract from Mapplewell (a small Yorkshire pit village) to join the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. KOYLI. He survived the battle of the Somme, which was not one engagement but a series which lasted for months. The first day was the worst for casualties. It was the bloodiest day in the history of the British Army, and one of the most infamous days of World War One. Gran’pa was wounded at Passchendaele in 1917, sent back home to be treated in a series of hospitals with half his calf shot away. He had not been discharged from hospital, so was still officially a serving soldier (a lance corporal by that time) when peace was declared on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. After a year in various hospitals he returned home to the coalface and spent the next forty years digging up coal, but at least no one was shooting at him. He got married, had a daughter (my mum) and lived into his eighties.

The anthology stories form a trilogy of sorts, linked to real people, real places and real events, however tenuously.

coads antho final cover fbThe Horse Head Violin
Published in the anthology Children of a Different Sky, edited by Alma Alexander

This anthology was a fundraiser for refugees, so the stories had to be relevant. Today’s refugee problems are horrendous. Everyone knows about Syria etc., but how many people recall the Belgian refugees of the First World War. Two hundred and fifty thousand Belgian refugees came to Britain during the war. The biggest influx of refugees in British history began on 14th October 2014, just days after Germany invaded Belgium. Following the fall of Antwerp, 16,000 refugees arrived in Folkestone in a single day, 14th October 1914, and we took them in. Let me say that again: we took them in! They were the first, so many arriving at once that they slept on the beaches and in community halls, anywhere they could lay their heads until they could be dispersed inland. Those who read Poirot might recall that he was a famous (fictional) Belgian refugee. My story follows a fictional brother and sister, sent to Leeds. They are welcomed and helped by a young woman who is the secretary of Dorothy Una Ratcliffe – a real person, the youngest ever lady mayoress of Leeds in 1913/14—who wrote (in her memoir Lady of a Million Daffodils) about the day she headed the committee of local ladies welcoming the first train of Belgian refugees. They settled here for four years, but within a year of the armistice they were gone. They didn’t always have a choice, their employment contracts in Britain were terminated to make way for returning soldiers, and the government offered them free one-way passage, but only for a limited period. They were pushed out of the country so quickly that they left little legacy.

second roundMake Me Immortal With a Kiss
Published in Second Round: A Return to the Ur-Bar, edited by Patricia Bray and Joshua Palmatier

The theme for this anthology was Gilgamesh’s travelling bar. The blurb says, “For thousands of years the immortal Gilgamesh has presided over the legendary Ur-Bar, witnessing history unfold from within its walls. Some days it is a rural tavern, others a fashionable wine shop. It may appear as a hidden speakeasy or take on the form of your neighborhood local. For most patrons it is simply a place to quench their thirst, but for a rare few the Ur-Bar is where they will meet their destiny.”

As one of the core authors I had to pick a period in which to set my story, and I chose the first day of the Battle of the Somme. On 1 July 1916, the British forces suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 fatalities. It’s told from the viewpoints of my two protagonists, a young army officer and a VAD nurse who meet and fall in love at just the wrong time. It’s a bittersweet story and, given the numbers, almost bound to end in tragedy, though, I hope, not a pointless one. Keeping the tradition of including real people, I wove my grandfather, Tommy Bennett into this story in a supporting role.

A Land Fit for Heroes
Due to be published in 2019 in the anthology, Portals, edited by Patricia Bray and Joshua Palmatier

portalssmallI’m a core author for this 2019 anthology from Zombies Need Brains press. I’ve only just finished writing this story, so it hasn’t even been edited yet. As the third of my World War One stories, this one concentrates on the aftermath of war. Thousands of soldiers returned from four years in the trenches only to discover that annie shawthe country they were fighting for no longer existed, at least, not as they remembered it. It’s that old story of never being able to go home, because home was four years ago. My two main characters are war-damaged, one mentally, the other physically. I tried to weave Tommy Bennett into this story, too, but the word count wouldn’t allow it. However, I did set the story in Mapplewell, the Yorkshire mining village where he lived. I also managed to get my grandmother, Annie Shaw (left), later Annie Bennett, into it briefly. One hundred years ago she was a barmaid at the Talbot Inn on Towngate in Mapplewell. She was a kindly woman, who wouldn’t have seen a thirsty ex-soldier without a pint of mild in his hand. That’s the background. The story takes place a hundred years ago  in February 1919. It has a portal in it, of course, but you’ll have to wait for the anthology to find out the details.

Have I got the First World War out of my brain yet? I honestly don’t know. I mean, never say never again, right? But for now, having done three stories, one from the beginning, one from the middle and one from the end, I think I can let the subject rest a while.

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