Dublin Worldcon 2019

This was my third Worldcon. I attended in 2014 in London, and 2017 in Helsinki.

The first thing to note is that Worldcon is BIG, with thousands of fans, authors, publishers and industry professionals with an enormous choice of panels, events, readings, kaffeeklatsches, signings, book launches, and, of course, the big events like the Hugo Awards ceremony (Sunday night) and the Masquerade (Saturday night). I went to the Hugos, but not the Masquerade as that was the night my publisher (DAW) had a dinner for DAW authors (DAWthors?).

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Okay, starting at the beginning.

I flew into Dublin on Tuesday morning and met up with my friend C at Dublin airport, Aer Lingus being kind enough to delay both our flights by 30 minutes, so neither of us was hanging about for too long. We used the airport bus which dropped us right outside of our hotel. The Hilton Garden Hotel on Custom House Quay is right on the riverside. It still being early, we dumped the bags in the hotel lock-up and did the Hop-on Hop-Off bus tour without hopping off. It was really just to say we’d done it, since we knew we wouldn’t be taking time for tourist stuff. On this occasion we hadn’t built that into our schedule like we did in Helsinki. The bus whizzed us past all manner of famous places almost too quickly to see them, but that was OK. We arrived back in time to check in. Hiltons are fairly reliable and we were comfortable enough, though it was a half-kilometre walk to and from the conference centre and there was no hotel attached.

Arriving early gave us the opportunity to check into the convention on Tuesday night with no queues. The folks who checked in on Wednesday and Thursday weren’t so lucky.

On this occasion I’d booked a table for Milford SF Writers, to promote the Milford Conference, workshopping week, the Writers’ Retreat and our bursaries for writers of colour. I’d managed to order a mini version of the ubiquitous pull-up stand which fitted into my suitcase. Though I have to say that stand and glossy leaflets weighed my luggage down somewhat. We set it up on Wednesday morning and then ran into Charlie Stross and had a pleasant coffee and catch-up at one of the local coffeeshops.

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If I had one criticism of the event it was the amount of queueing for EVERYTHING. Queues for panels, queues for tickets (free) for events with limited space. Not everyone who wanted to could attend the Hugos, so tickets became available at 1.00 on the day of the event. That meant that I didn’t get into the panel I wanted to see that also started at the same time. By the time I collected my tickets and got to the panel, hoping to slip into the back of the room, it was full.

Having the Milford stand did give a few of us somewhere to retreat to when the crowds became overwhelming and we spoke to quite a few potential Milford attendees. Milford is always sold out, but it’s nice to get new faces in there.

I attended some good panels, though I’m not going to list them all. Special mention for a late addition to the programme – ‘Writing Thomas the Rhymer: balladry and storytelling’ with Ellen Kushner, which turned out to be half talk and half Ellen singing some of the ballads that inspired her. I’m a sucker for ballads.

Friday was my day for doing panels rather than attending them. I had three panels all at the Point – one stop away from the Convention Centre on the Luas Red Line. There were panel rooms in the Odeon and in the Gibson hotel next door. Unfortunately there was nowhere to hang out (that I found) so though I’d planned to be there for the whole day I ended up going back to the CCD between my first and second panels. Hopefully they sorted out their queueing failures as the weekend wore on but the queues were such at the Point Odeon, that people who had arrived in plenty of time didn’t get into the panels until ten minutes after the start time. Since panels MUST finish ten minutes before the next panel is due to start, that cut down a 50 minute panel to 40 minutes.

Here are my panels:

You read my mind’: telepathy in SFF romance
Whether it’s the ability to read your partner’s mind or mutual telepathic communication, telepathy adds the potential for both conflict and closeness in a romantic relationship. In what ways do science fictional and paranormal romance novels use telepathy? What are the potential pitfalls and complications of writing a mind-reading character? With Donna Maree Hanson (M), Sarah Rees Brennan, Chelsea Mueller, Jacey Bedford

Unwritable Stories
Every author has that perfect story that just refuses to be written. From willful characters to wandering narratives and gaping plot holes, our panelists share the stories that would have even defied the Greek muses themselves. What made these stories so hard to write? What traps did they hold? And whatever happened to those old untold tales? Will they ever see the light of day or will they remain locked away in a hidden drawer? With Karen Haber, Nina Allan, Jay Caselberg, Michael Swanwick, Jacey Bedford

Only Happy When it Rains: Water in SFF
Water has provided SFF with a rich source of inspiration. Its presence (or absence) colours every climate change story, gives us drowned worlds, desert planets, or eerie low-gravity waves on a terraformed Mars. Water is the setting for journeys of 20,000 leagues and contact with minds beyond our own. This panel will discuss how water can shape themes, settings, and narratives in SFF stories. With Jacey Bedford (M), Paolo Bacigalupi, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Dr Cat Sparks, James Patrick Kelly

I was moderating that last one. Unfortunately Paolo Bacigalupi didn’t turn up. I don’t know whether he missed the convention altogether, or just missed that panel, but there was no message to say he wasn’t coming. Luckily James, Cat and Adrian all had plenty to say and I got away with asking questions rather than providing answers.

During the convention I managed to have successful one-to-one meetings with my editor, and agent (who I usually talk to on Skype).

On Saturday I spent more time on the Milford stand, had lunch with a friend from Australia and managed to miss most of the panels I’d intended to see because I couldn’t face the queues and also because I spent time with friends. Saturday evening was the DAW dinner with editors Sheila Gilbert and Betsy Wollheim, plus authors – including Kari Sperring, Seanan McGuire, Michelle Sagara, Joshua Palmatier, Pat Rothfuss. Great company and delightful food at the Ely Wine Bar.

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On Sunday my favourite panel was: An army marches on its stomach, an empire on its gold. Fantasy economics. I even took NOTES! And then in the evening we attended the Hugos in the CCD auditorium. A posh frock event for some and casual for others. It didn’t matter, everyone enjoyed it. I hadn’t voted in every category, but it was interesting to see how my votes stacked up against the winners. My editor, Sheila Gilbert was once again up for Best Editor, Longform, but since she won it last year, she was sure she wouldn’t get it this year. Some people accepted gracefully, their speeches short and sweet. Others were witty and charming. One went off the deep end somewhat spectacularly (mentioning no names). But all-in all it was a lovely evening, and a great way to end the con (for us).

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The event went on into Monday, but C and I had booked return flights for Monday early afternoon, so with check-in times, we were heading for the airport by 11.00. Aer Lingus very kindly gave back the half hour it stole on the way in, by making my return flight half an hour late, too. Ah, the joy of travel.

Next year’s Worldcon is in Wellington, New Zealand. I’ve already bought my membership.

About Jacey Bedford

Jacey Bedford maintains this blog. She is a writer of science fiction and fantasy (www.jaceybedford.co.uk), the secretary of Milford SF Writers (www.milfordSF.co.uk), a singer (www.artisan-harmony.com) and a music agent booking UK tours and concerts for folk performers (www.jacey-bedford.com). She's also a Home Office / UK Visas and Immigration department licensed sponsor processing UK work permits (Certificates of Sponsorship).
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7 Responses to Dublin Worldcon 2019

  1. Gorgeous Gary says:

    It was great seeing you, if only at the Water in SFF panel. Which was an excellent panel.

    We had some challenges due to having our 4-year old ADHD son along with us and ending up in a hotel 2 km from the CCD (Jurys Inn Parnell Square), but in the end still managed to have a good time. We did have time to play tourist, taking a bus tour down to Kilkenny and a train across to Galway, in addition to a few things around Dublin. (Including one of the hop-on hop-off buses.)

    Would love to do NZ but it’s just not in the cards.

    • Jacey Bedford says:

      I enjoyed doing the Water in SF panel, even though I’m not usually keen to moderate. It was nice asking the questions for a change. I stayed with a friend near Kilkenny (Thomastown) a few years ago. Lovely country.

  2. sjhigbee says:

    Wow! It all sounds incredibly intense, Jacey. I did think about going – but in the end, given we suddenly had a new roof to pay for, it’s just as well I didn’t. Thank you for such a detailed, enjoyable account.

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