Retro-Blog of a Pre-published Writer from March 2008

A few more interesting notes from my old blog. Long before I got my book deal I was working on Empire of Dust and Winterwood,  the books that were to become the first books in my two trilogies. At the same time I was looking for another agent. This is what I wrote then

March 4th 2008

The thing about being a musician’s-agent is that there are certain parallels to being a literary agent. Part of my [music] job is to gently turn people away from my door. I get more approaches from hopefuls than I can possibly deal with. A couple of weeks ago I’d had eight acts call me by lunchtime on Tuesday. It would be impossible to take on all of them–or any of them, for that matter–even though they are mostly excellent. So what makes an approach from one musician stand out above the rest? Why do I sometimes say yes to an act even though I know, strictly speaking, that I need another act on my books like a fish needs an umbrella? Maybe if I could figure that out, I could apply it to my own literary agent search, make my ‘package’ memorable–and no, I don’t mean perfumed pink paper and purple ink–and snag my agent of choice.

Unfortunately, more often than not, with musicians… it just depends what mood I’m in when a package lands on my doormat. I suspect it’s like that with literary agents too. However professional you are, there are some days when you’ll be more receptive to certain ideas than others. I’m sure I’ve turned down some winning acts… in fact I know I have. Right now it could be the Beatles’ reunion tour knocking on my door and I’d have to say no because I’m just too damn busy.

Writing the Breakout NovelSo next time I get a negative from a literary agent I’ll just remember it’s a lottery.

[HINDSIGHT NOTE: I did get a new agent and then she got out of agenting, so I got another agent with a big firm in NY. Then she left the firm and as a result my agent is now Donald Maass! Yes, THAT Donald Maass. Whoo-hoo!]

 

March 8th 2008

Trip to York. I met up with Sue and her best beloved for lunch at Cafe Concerto before going with Sue to what was supposed to be a NaNoWriMo get together in the cafe of York Art Gallery. All I can say is that I’m glad Sue was there because the three young women who turned up were pleasant enough but were either shy or…

nano_08_winner_large

Winner’s Badge 2008

Why do people come to meetings if they don’t want to say anything? Why do people join NaNoWriMo if they aren’t passionate about writing? (Note: I don’t expect everyone to finish NaNo because it’s a hell of a thing to do, write 50k words in 30 days, but at least you should surely be interested in the writing process or else why are you signed up?) I think I’ve been spoiled by the level of commitment of Milford writers. Or… maybe the three quiet ones thought Sue and I were a couple of cackly crones who totally took over their  contemplative meet.

Oh well…

Empire of Dust

Empire of Dust – Cover

But one great thing was that, over lunch, S & R really helped to noodle a world-building glitch that had been troubling me in Empire of Dust. (Thanks, guys.)

Another good thing was that last night I started to read the first draft of the magic-pirate-adventure-quest novel that I did 50k words on under NaNo conditions last November, and having left it to mature for three months I actually found I was a) enjoying reading it and b) wanting to turn the next page because I’d semi-forgotten what happened next. This has to be A Good Thing. Of course the first draft is not quite complete yet. I have the final chapter to write. I intend to read through once and then write the last chapter. The outline (yes I actually wrote this one to an outline rather than my usual write-it-and-see mode) merely says: stuff happens and the good guys win.

This is the book I took to Milford in October 07 – then entitled The Elf-Oak Box – the one that got critted on International Talk Like a Pirate Day. At that point I only had 9k words, but now I have 78k and I reckon it will come in at about 85 – 90k when finished. That’s just about the shortest first draft I’ve even managed. (Longest being 240k which was ridiculous!) I think (and hope) that this one has legs.

 

9th March 2008

It must have been seeing Sue yesterday and going to the NaNoWriMo meeting, but I got a double dose of writerly enthusiasm. I redid the synopsis for of Empire of Dust. It doesn’t make a huge difference to the plot or the characters, but it does make a bit more pseudo-scientific sense in the storyline. (i.e. the technobabble is a little less unbelievable even though the science is still so soft it’s dripping off the bottom of the page).

Winterwood front cover

Winterwood by Jacey Bedford, published by DAW, Feb 2016.

So I got up at 8.00 this morning (an unheard of time for me, especially on a Sunday) to finish reading and start writing the last bit of the magic-pirate-adventure-quest novel. I’ve written 3k words so far today and worked out most of what’s going to happen in the stuff happens and the good guys win outline of the last two chapters.

In re-reading it I was amazed. It didn’t read like a first draft at all – especially a first draft done at the rate of 50k words in 21 days under NaNoWriMo conditions. (I did my 50k words in November even though I was away for a week!) In fact, I think the book might seriously have legs. I was gobsmacked. I’m not saying it’s deathless prose or anything, but it works better than something written so quickly has a right to.

It could even work as YA though the protag is 33 and it’s got a couple of f*cks in it (the word not the action) and also a couple of f*cks in it (the action not the word). Though they do happen on the page, they are not graphic. (BTW can I say f*ck without the net ghods stomping on me?) I think the protag being 33 is more of a contraindication than the f*cks for a YA these days.

[HINDSIGHT NOTE – it’s definitely NOT YA and the protag is 25.]

15th March 2008

The first draft of the magic-pirate-adventure-quest novel is in the bag. It’s come it at 87,700 words, less than 3k over my estimate and I’m really happy with it. I’m less happy with the title. At the moment it’s ‘The Elf-oak Box’, but I’m open to suggestions.

Whoo! I’m still grinning. I love typing: The End.

[HINDSIGHT NOTE: The Elf Oak Box eventually turned into Winterwood and came in at 133,000 words.]

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About Jacey Bedford

Jacey Bedford maintains this blog. She is a writer of science fiction and fantasy (www.jaceybedford.co.uk), the secretary of Milford SF Writers (www.milfordSF.co.uk), a singer (www.artisan-harmony.com) and a music agent booking UK tours and concerts for folk performers (www.jacey-bedford.com). She's also a Home Office / UK Visas and Immigration department licensed sponsor processing UK work permits (Certificates of Sponsorship).
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4 Responses to Retro-Blog of a Pre-published Writer from March 2008

  1. jazzlet says:

    I smiled reading
    8th March “final chapter to write”
    9th March “last two chapters”.

    • Jacey Bedford says:

      Yeah, it happens. Did you notice that I thought it was finished at way under 100,000 words and it ended up being over 130,000 words by the time my editor had finished making suggestions!

      • jazzlet says:

        Oh yes, but it was you who thought you could finish it in one chapter not someone else saying ‘more!’ 😉

        I am serioulsy lousy at judging how long it takes to do things, it’s been brought home to me by having a chronic pain problem and the associated lack of energy. So sure I can still say cook, but I have to consider carefully how long all the prep will take because I can’t chop, get a tsp of this and a tbs of that ready, clean up as I go and do the cooking if it takes me beyond an hour, I just have to stop and sit down. It does mean I have got some meals where I do know how much time and effort I will need, whether that’s with a break or they can be done in one go. So it made me smile that I’m not the only one misjudging these things.

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