Home from Milford – Tired but Happy

Wall hanging 03

A section of the delightful wall hanging by Eta Ingham Lawrie that decorates the main meeting room at Trigonos

I’ve just arrived home from Milford SF Writers’ Conference in North Wales, and I could sleep for a week. I’m not ready for the real world yet. After a week of intense writing critique punctuated by meals taken with fourteen other science fiction and fantasy writers, the real world seems a bit tame, even though I’ve come home to husband, dog, mother, and two lovely visitors.

Milford Group 01

The whole Milford 2019 group L to R: Steph Bianchini, Sue Oke, Mark Bilsborough, Mbozi (Tania) Haimbe, Russell Smith, Terry Jackman, Tiffani Angus, Sam Tovey, Tina Anghelatos, Kari Sperring, Jacey Bedford, Powder Thompson, Liz Williams, Victor Ocampo, and Pauline Dungate.

Fifteen science fiction and fantasy writers submitted close to 200,000 words between them – a total of twenty pieces, which we critiqued at the rate of four pieces per day. Critiquing is hard work. You have to read and evaluate, get your thoughts into some kind of sensible order, and deliver a verbal critique in not more than four minutes (after which you can send your written critique, often with extra notes, to the author). Four minutes doesn’t sound like long, but it’s plenty of time, especially since thirteen other writers also have to deliver their four-minutes-worth and the author has to have their say at the end. Each piece takes about an hour to critique. This is widely known as the Milford Method. We current Milford committee members (I’m secretary) can take no credit for inventing it because Milford began in 1956 in Milford Pennsylvania (started by Damon Knight) and was brought to the UK (to Milford on Sea) in 1972 by James Blish. It works as a method of keeping group critiques user-friendly. Critique is constructive and never directed at the writer personally, but at the piece of writing. Even the best piece of writing can be improved upon, and our intention is to make each piece the best it can possibly be.

Caernarfon 04

Russell Smith, Liz Williams and Victor Ocampo have captured Caernarfon Castle, and are now popping out for a nice cup of tea.

We had fabulous weather. After a little rain on the Sunday, the sun came out and bathed us in warmth for five days. We read, ate, critiqued the submitted pieces, went for walks in Trigonos’ lovely grounds, took photos of the delightful scenery, made time for a short trip into Caernarfon where Russell, Liz and Victor, captured the castle before lunch, then having done that popped out for a nice cup of tea.

On the Friday, crits finished for the week, we headed to Criccieth, schlepped up (and I mean UP) to the castle, then headed off to Dylan’s excellent fish restaurant for a leisurely lunch. For me, mackerel pate followed by a ‘small’ chowder and a sticky toffee pudding. I’d be afraid to see what size the large chowder is. The small one was enormous.

Then we took the opportunity to do a little retail therapy. The first craft shop I walked in to was lovely and I was just admiring some hand made cards when a voice from the counter said, “Jacey Bedford!”

“Yes,” I confessed.

Criccieth Castle 21

Criccieth Castle

It turns out that the lady (a silk artist) is an Artisan fan and also reads this blog. <Waves in the direction of Criccieth.> I was amazed. I never expect to be recognised. It’s only happened a few times before – and most of those in the USA, strangely enough. But it was really nice to find someone who listens to our music. The rest of the group was mightily impressed! Brian was really pleased when I told him.

You might have guessed I love going to Milford. It always gives me a tremendous boost of writerly enthusiasm. I make new friends, and learn about new markets for books and short stories (and pick up some gossip about the publishing world). I’m pretty sure that if it hadn’t been for a contact I made at Milford I would never have landed my first book on the right editor’s desk at the right time.

Milford 2020 still (at the time of writing) has a few places still open, and the application process for the Writers of Colour bursaries is open. There are application forms and details on the Milford website.

We open applications for Milford two years in advance, so you can book now for Milford 2020 and 2021, and also for the Milford Writers retreat in June 2020 and May 2021. The Writers’ Retreat is just what it sounds like. Held at Trigonos, you get a week, in glorious surroundings and without interruptions, to write to your heart’s content. And you get to meet up with other writers doing the same thing. It’s fab!

Crit room 02

Trigonos’ main meeting room, waiting for a critique session to start

Here’s a link to the Milford blog with a slightly different perspective and more pics.

And here’s the Milford website.

About Jacey Bedford

Jacey Bedford maintains this blog. She is a writer of science fiction and fantasy (www.jaceybedford.co.uk), the secretary of Milford SF Writers (www.milfordSF.co.uk), a singer (www.artisan-harmony.com) and a music agent booking UK tours and concerts for folk performers (www.jacey-bedford.com). She's also a Home Office / UK Visas and Immigration department licensed sponsor processing UK work permits (Certificates of Sponsorship).
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