Reading Writing and Rewriting

Wish for a PonyI was a voracious reader as a child, working my way steadily through the stock of my local public library children’s department. My literature of choice was anything with horses or ponies in it. Some of the books in my local library were quite old, so I read my way through stories by Monica Edwards, Elyne Mitchell, Ruby Ferguson, Judith M. Berrisford and the Pullein-Thompson sisters, Josephine, Diana and Christine. If it had a horse on the cover I would read it.

Imagine my surprise, then, when one horse book I read turned out to be something a little different. The Horse and His Boy was my gateway book into fantasy (horses and a magical fantasy land!) and after that I read all of C. S. Lewis’ Narnia books and never looked back.

So a few years ago I decided to see what pony books were available today and I was horrified by the number of shocking (in more ways than one) pink covers depicting sparkly ponies or even unicorns. Where were the ‘serious’ pony stories of my youth? What do little girls read when they grow up but don’t grow out of wanting to read about horses?

What do writers do when they grow up, but still want to write about horses?

They write.

So between writing the fantasy and space opera trilogies for an adult audience, I started writing a pony book aimed at young readers. I’ve been a child, a teen, a tween, I’ve been a children’s librarian and I’ve had children, so I had a reasonable head start, however I’m not a child any more so the plot started to get twistier and the characters more complex. I reined myself in, edited out some of the twists and completed a simple version, which would work well for middle grade, but I wanted something a little meatier and so after leaving it on one side for a few years while I finished other projects I’ve come back to it. And… I think it wants to be a Young Adult book. So I’m doing an editing pass to age-up the characters, add back some of those twists and a touch of romance.

There are still horses, of course.

And magic.

Winterwood-Silverwolf-Rowankind

It’s set in the same story-world as my Rowankind books, though two hundred years later. What happened in the Rowankind books slowed down the emergence of the Industrial Revolution, so though it’s close to modern day there are no personal computers or mobile phones. Television is in its infancy and buses and trains run on steam power with petrol engine cars a bit of a rarity. Not every family has a car, but that’s okay because they’re hardly reliable anyway and often more trouble than they’re worth.

Magic exists, but it’s a well-kept secret, helped by the fact that nomps, non-magical people, can’t cope with the possibility of magic, so they find ways to explain it away and generally believe that it doesn’t exist, so for them it doesn’t. Any time they witness something magical they rationalise it and it soon disappears from their memory.

Jester 1My main character, Tiv, is from a magically talented family, but despite all expectations she’s got hardly any magic at all, and though she went to a specialist private school she flunked all her practical magic exams and took extra geography and history instead. Her talents lie elsewhere. She’s a talented young horsewoman and rides a piebald Romany Vanner called Jester. Their neighbours’ son, Ryan, has a thoroughbred-cross-something called Bonaparte who has been troubled by a series of unpredictable and dangerous attacks of the terrors. It has put an end to his promising showjumping career, Ryan is currently his caretaker, not his owner. Tiv may not be much of a witch, but she knows about magic, and so when Boney has an attack of the frights one day she quickly identifies the problem. The title of the book is: YOUR HORSE SEES DEAD PEOPLE.

spookedThere’s more to it than that, of course. Ryan’s dad is suffering from a form of early dementia, possibly magically induced, and Tiv’s dad disappeared during a magical investigation almost a year earlier. Tiv and her mum are determined to find out what has happened to him. There are surprises and revelations along the way. If I told you, I’d have to shoot you.

I’m not generally one of those writers who finds actor-lookalikes for my cast of characters, but I do work visually… and Pinterest has some stunning images of horses of all kinds, so I have cast my horse characters.

Sometimes it’s hard to know how to end a book. With this one I have the opposite problem. I have two potential endings and I like them both, so obviously I have to make a hard editorial choice. Fortunately I think I can work in my favourite scene from one of the endings into the other one.

All is not yet lost!

Before you ask, it’s a long way from finding a home. I’ve just had some exciting news about another project which is going to distract me for a while, but I can’t tell you yet.

About Jacey Bedford

Jacey Bedford maintains this blog. She is a writer of science fiction and fantasy (www.jaceybedford.co.uk), the secretary of Milford SF Writers (www.milfordSF.co.uk), a singer (www.artisan-harmony.com) and a music agent booking UK tours and concerts for folk performers (www.jacey-bedford.com). She's also a Home Office / UK Visas and Immigration department licensed sponsor processing UK work permits (Certificates of Sponsorship).
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2 Responses to Reading Writing and Rewriting

  1. Jacey Bedford says:

    In most stories girls have beautiful ponies. I wanted something with more character, so I figured a Vanner was the perfect compromise – tough and sensible. But can you imagine keeping those feathers clean?

  2. Jazzlet says:

    Tease!

    That Vanner is stunning.

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