Generating Ideas – a guest post by Joshua Palmatier

Apocalypse

The three new themes for Zombies Need Brains’ Kickstarter have been revealed (apocalypses, food, old tech finding new life) and I thought I’d offer up a suggestion here for how to generate an idea that fits a theme AND make certain that it’s an idea that will stick out in that slush pile.  After all, you don’t want to submit a story with a fairly standard concept fitting the theme, since we’ll receive a ton of those.  And while we take a few “standard concept” stories for each theme, we usually only take one or two and you don’t want to be in competition with two hundred other people who used that same idea in some form.  Much better to submit a story that’s NOT standard and that catches our attention, one that is unlikely to have been used by anyone else.

Here’s the suggestion/writing tip for generating this non-standard idea that fits the theme:

  1.  Sit down, open up your notebook or blank file, and set a timer.
  2.  Spend the next half hour trying to come up with 24 ideas that fit the theme.

Don’t think about it, just brainstorm.  Write out whatever idea comes to mind.  Don’t worry if it’s standard or not, if you’ve seen it in a hundred other short stories or if it’s just way too crazy.  Let your editing brain go and dive completely naked into the creative pool.  And don’t worry about what the “story” may be yet (unless that comes along for the ride with the idea).  Focus on ideas.  Story can come later.

This process should start out in a frenzy of activity for the first ten minutes.  This is likely because the first ten ideas that pop to mind will be what we’d call standard concepts, the ideas that have been done to death by everyone and their cat.  That’s fine.  Let the frenzy drive you into the next ten minutes.

This is where you’ll start to slow down and where your brain begins to stretch and reach for those non-standard ideas.  You’ll probably smile with some of the thoughts that flit through your mind here.  Or maybe groan and mumble, “That’s stupid.”  Or maybe you’ll mutter, “Ooo, that has potential.”  You’ll maybe get another ten ideas jotted down here.

The last ten minutes will probably seem like forever, because this is where you REALLY have to stretch.  You’ll probably be tapping that pen against your chin as you think.  Every time you get an idea, you’ll laugh hysterically because IT’S JUST TOO INSANE!  But write it down anyway.  Reach for more!  Insanity is fun!  Embrace it!  Drink it in and gargle!  Don’t choke!

You may not reach 24 ideas.  You may end up with more.  The goal is to force yourself to brainstorm and stretch beyond your limits and beyond those standard ideas.  In general, the first ten ideas you’ve scratched out will BE those standard ideas.  The last ten will be just too crazy to really contemplate.  They probably stretch far beyond the theme and wouldn’t make the cut because of that.  But right in the middle–those elusive four in the center–you’ll likely find some great ideas that fit the theme but AREN’T ones that will appear in a hundred other slush pile submissions.  Those are the ideas you should focus on and start developing stories around.  Those are probably the ideas that have the greatest chance of getting picked for the anthology.

This isn’t an exact science, of course.  The best idea on your list may come earlier or later.  Obviously you need to consider each idea individually and decide whether it has merit or not.  Sometimes, trying for that totally insane idea works.  Sometimes, with the right twist, that standard idea will stun us.  YOU’VE got to make that final decision on what idea works for YOU, because if it doesn’t excite you, then it’s already failed.  Find the idea that speaks to you the most.  That will generate the best story.

Then sit down and write it, revise it, polish it up, and send it in.  We can’t wait to read it!

******************

This post is brought to you by the Zombies Need Brains Kickstarter currently going on at tinyurl.com/ZNBApocalypse. Swing on by and check out the details for the three new anthologies we’re hoping to fund, including APOCALYPTIC, GALACTIC STEW, and MY BATTERY IS LOW AND IT IS GETTING DARK. Pick a reward level that suits you and back our project!  We can’t do an open call for submissions unless we get funded. And once we are funded, sit down and brainstorm a cool idea, write it up, and send it in!

******************

CandidJoshJOSHUA PALMATIER is a fantasy author with a PhD in mathematics.  He currently teaches at SUNY Oneonta in upstate New York, while writing in his “spare” time, editing anthologies, and running the anthology-producing small press Zombies Need Brains LLC.  His most recent fantasy novel, Reaping the Aurora, concludes the fantasy series begun in Shattering the Ley and Threading the Needle, although you can also find his “Throne of Amenkor” series and the “Well of Sorrows” series still on the shelves.  He is currently hard at work writing his next novel and designing the kickstarter for the next Zombies Need Brains anthology project.  You can find out more at www.joshuapalmatier.com or at the small press’ site www.zombiesneedbrains.com.  Or follow him on Twitter as @bentateauthor or @ZNBLLC.

Posted in fantasy, science fiction, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dublin Worldcon 2019

This was my third Worldcon. I attended in 2014 in London, and 2017 in Helsinki.

The first thing to note is that Worldcon is BIG, with thousands of fans, authors, publishers and industry professionals with an enormous choice of panels, events, readings, kaffeeklatsches, signings, book launches, and, of course, the big events like the Hugo Awards ceremony (Sunday night) and the Masquerade (Saturday night). I went to the Hugos, but not the Masquerade as that was the night my publisher (DAW) had a dinner for DAW authors (DAWthors?).

IMG_20190815_180735245

Okay, starting at the beginning.

I flew into Dublin on Tuesday morning and met up with my friend C at Dublin airport, Aer Lingus being kind enough to delay both our flights by 30 minutes, so neither of us was hanging about for too long. We used the airport bus which dropped us right outside of our hotel. The Hilton Garden Hotel on Custom House Quay is right on the riverside. It still being early, we dumped the bags in the hotel lock-up and did the Hop-on Hop-Off bus tour without hopping off. It was really just to say we’d done it, since we knew we wouldn’t be taking time for tourist stuff. On this occasion we hadn’t built that into our schedule like we did in Helsinki. The bus whizzed us past all manner of famous places almost too quickly to see them, but that was OK. We arrived back in time to check in. Hiltons are fairly reliable and we were comfortable enough, though it was a half-kilometre walk to and from the conference centre and there was no hotel attached.

Arriving early gave us the opportunity to check into the convention on Tuesday night with no queues. The folks who checked in on Wednesday and Thursday weren’t so lucky.

On this occasion I’d booked a table for Milford SF Writers, to promote the Milford Conference, workshopping week, the Writers’ Retreat and our bursaries for writers of colour. I’d managed to order a mini version of the ubiquitous pull-up stand which fitted into my suitcase. Though I have to say that stand and glossy leaflets weighed my luggage down somewhat. We set it up on Wednesday morning and then ran into Charlie Stross and had a pleasant coffee and catch-up at one of the local coffeeshops.

IMG_20190816_121846282

If I had one criticism of the event it was the amount of queueing for EVERYTHING. Queues for panels, queues for tickets (free) for events with limited space. Not everyone who wanted to could attend the Hugos, so tickets became available at 1.00 on the day of the event. That meant that I didn’t get into the panel I wanted to see that also started at the same time. By the time I collected my tickets and got to the panel, hoping to slip into the back of the room, it was full.

Having the Milford stand did give a few of us somewhere to retreat to when the crowds became overwhelming and we spoke to quite a few potential Milford attendees. Milford is always sold out, but it’s nice to get new faces in there.

I attended some good panels, though I’m not going to list them all. Special mention for a late addition to the programme – ‘Writing Thomas the Rhymer: balladry and storytelling’ with Ellen Kushner, which turned out to be half talk and half Ellen singing some of the ballads that inspired her. I’m a sucker for ballads.

Friday was my day for doing panels rather than attending them. I had three panels all at the Point – one stop away from the Convention Centre on the Luas Red Line. There were panel rooms in the Odeon and in the Gibson hotel next door. Unfortunately there was nowhere to hang out (that I found) so though I’d planned to be there for the whole day I ended up going back to the CCD between my first and second panels. Hopefully they sorted out their queueing failures as the weekend wore on but the queues were such at the Point Odeon, that people who had arrived in plenty of time didn’t get into the panels until ten minutes after the start time. Since panels MUST finish ten minutes before the next panel is due to start, that cut down a 50 minute panel to 40 minutes.

Here are my panels:

You read my mind’: telepathy in SFF romance
Whether it’s the ability to read your partner’s mind or mutual telepathic communication, telepathy adds the potential for both conflict and closeness in a romantic relationship. In what ways do science fictional and paranormal romance novels use telepathy? What are the potential pitfalls and complications of writing a mind-reading character? With Donna Maree Hanson (M), Sarah Rees Brennan, Chelsea Mueller, Jacey Bedford

Unwritable Stories
Every author has that perfect story that just refuses to be written. From willful characters to wandering narratives and gaping plot holes, our panelists share the stories that would have even defied the Greek muses themselves. What made these stories so hard to write? What traps did they hold? And whatever happened to those old untold tales? Will they ever see the light of day or will they remain locked away in a hidden drawer? With Karen Haber, Nina Allan, Jay Caselberg, Michael Swanwick, Jacey Bedford

Only Happy When it Rains: Water in SFF
Water has provided SFF with a rich source of inspiration. Its presence (or absence) colours every climate change story, gives us drowned worlds, desert planets, or eerie low-gravity waves on a terraformed Mars. Water is the setting for journeys of 20,000 leagues and contact with minds beyond our own. This panel will discuss how water can shape themes, settings, and narratives in SFF stories. With Jacey Bedford (M), Paolo Bacigalupi, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Dr Cat Sparks, James Patrick Kelly

I was moderating that last one. Unfortunately Paolo Bacigalupi didn’t turn up. I don’t know whether he missed the convention altogether, or just missed that panel, but there was no message to say he wasn’t coming. Luckily James, Cat and Adrian all had plenty to say and I got away with asking questions rather than providing answers.

During the convention I managed to have successful one-to-one meetings with my editor, and agent (who I usually talk to on Skype).

On Saturday I spent more time on the Milford stand, had lunch with a friend from Australia and managed to miss most of the panels I’d intended to see because I couldn’t face the queues and also because I spent time with friends. Saturday evening was the DAW dinner with editors Sheila Gilbert and Betsy Wollheim, plus authors – including Kari Sperring, Seanan McGuire, Michelle Sagara, Joshua Palmatier, Pat Rothfuss. Great company and delightful food at the Ely Wine Bar.

IMG_1127

On Sunday my favourite panel was: An army marches on its stomach, an empire on its gold. Fantasy economics. I even took NOTES! And then in the evening we attended the Hugos in the CCD auditorium. A posh frock event for some and casual for others. It didn’t matter, everyone enjoyed it. I hadn’t voted in every category, but it was interesting to see how my votes stacked up against the winners. My editor, Sheila Gilbert was once again up for Best Editor, Longform, but since she won it last year, she was sure she wouldn’t get it this year. Some people accepted gracefully, their speeches short and sweet. Others were witty and charming. One went off the deep end somewhat spectacularly (mentioning no names). But all-in all it was a lovely evening, and a great way to end the con (for us).

IMG_20190818_193825387

The event went on into Monday, but C and I had booked return flights for Monday early afternoon, so with check-in times, we were heading for the airport by 11.00. Aer Lingus very kindly gave back the half hour it stole on the way in, by making my return flight half an hour late, too. Ah, the joy of travel.

Next year’s Worldcon is in Wellington, New Zealand. I’ve already bought my membership.

Posted in fantasy, science fiction, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

My Other Journal in a Galaxy Far far Away

In 2008 I started a blog on LiveJornal (and later moved everything over to Dreamwidth, but that’s another story). These days I mostly keep Dreamwidth for book and movie reviews, but in those early days my blogs were much more diary-like. Here’s a series of entries from early 2008. It’s a perfect illustration of thoughts of a (then) unpublished writer. The book I’m talking about revising in 2008 was written in 1998, bought by DAW in 2013 and came out in 2014. Only sisteen years from first draft to publication!

11th February 2008

Ah the joys of titling your work.

I’m currently working on a fairly major revision of the book that started out as Cora (working title). I’ll chew through the reasons for the revision in another post, but… the title is still driving me nuts.

It’s a space-opera / colony adventure with bad corporations, black-ops fleets, aggravating settlers who mean well but do the wrong things, some cool techy stuff, some romance, a lot of betrayal and a some rollicking action. No hard science.

Cora was only ever a working title – it’s a bit too McCaffreyesque (‘Damia’ etc.). So before the darn thing got submitted to HarperCollins (that’s a long story) I changed the title to ‘Written in Dust.’  It’s from a quotation: “Who then to frail mortality shall trust, But limns on water, or but writes in dust,” – Francis Bacon (1561-1626). Since the whole novel has an overarching theme about the nature of trust, it seemed like a good title, if a little pedestrian.

Then I figured that a better title might be ‘The Settlement’ because a) it’s about a settlement / colony and b) at the end the good guys have to make a deal – a settlement – with the bad guys because they’re in a lose/lose situation and they manage to pull a win out of the hat after some hijinks.

That was the stage I was at until a couple of nights ago. I marginally preferred ‘The Settlement.’ [personal profile] maeve_the_red preferred sticking with ‘Written in Dust’ and [personal profile] mevennen, who read an early draft at Milford in 1998, probably still recognises it as ‘Cora’. And then I was half listening to a song on TV and a phrase leaped out at me that really fits. How about ‘Empire of Dirt’?

Go on. What do you think of it as a title? ‘Empire of Dirt.’ It’s from the song ‘Hurt’ by Nine Inch nails, written by Trent Reznor.

Okay, back to the revision, whatever it’s called.

-o0o-

14th February 2008

Spent all of today very productively revising the multi-titled novel. I think I’m leaning towards Empire of Dust  – a combination of Written in Dust and Empire of Dirt.

Anyhow, it’s coming along nicely, though this started out as a not very big revision and it’s become huge. I’m going to have a new ending to write and I’m going to need to make sure it’s compact enough that I can lose at least 20k from what’s currently in the file. I don’t think that will be a problem as the way it’s shaping up, the ending will be much snappier and less convoluted.

I’m also still agent hunting and have discovered a new one, just taking on, whose quoted likes very much parallel my own. I’m going to send a query. It’s several years since I parted company from the last agent and about time I got my act together to get a new one.

-o0o-

18th February 2008

I just lost three scenes from the new ending of ‘Empire of Dust’ with a single careless click. All today’s work, in fact. I thought I had Word set to save automatically every ten minutes… in fact I did… so WTF is it?

I hate bloody Microshaft. (Okay, it’s my fault, but I still hate bloody Microshaft!)

Nuff said.

-o0o-

26th February 2008

I finished the new ending to Empire of Dust.

Let me say that again.

I FINISHED the new ending to Empire of Dust.

It didn’t end quite how I thought it would end and I’m definitely set up to commit sequel if I ever get the opportunity. I saved a minor character I had previously killed and killed one who had previously come through unscathed. I rewarded my characters with their very own cool spaceship and a new home on an underworld space station. I left a slight loose end in case I want to go back to it, but it’s not so loose as to be annoying (I hope.)

I’ve now got a couple of incidents and a little bit of set-up in the earlier part of the book that were echoed in the previous ending and have now been orphaned, but I’m not sure that matters. I need to ask my beta-readers. It also means that one of the plot threads which previously ran right through to the final solution now ties up a little earlier and the final solution is purely about the central conflict.

And I’m still liking the title.

-o0o-

And yes, I kept the title and this is how it ended up – with added sequels. Thank you, DAW.

Psi-tech trilogy

Posted in fantasy, science fiction, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Visit to the British Museum

British Museum

As I said in my last blog I was down in London for the Science for Fiction course and T and I stayed over an extra day to visit the British Museum. It’s mightily impressive both for its collections and for the building itself, a classical frontage, entirely in keeping with the gravitas of the institution, and then, once inside, the modern central court with a breathtaking glass ceiling designed by architect Norman Foster.

BM Central court 03

The museum is a vast complex of rooms and spaces, so anyone visiting for the first time should buy a map. We didn’t bother with a guide book, but instead went for the map option, heading first for the Enlightenment Exhibition in the room which originally housed George III’s library. We followed that by visiting the European/Medieval section (via a few Egyptian mummies) and finally the Parthenon Marbles which I’ve always wanted to see.

This was punctuated by stops in the coffee shops to rehydrate and rest our feet. To be honest, though we had a plan, half the fun is finding things you didn’t know you wanted to see until… there they were. I was particularly struck by ‘Lely’s Venus’, the statue of Venus (Aphrodite) dating from the 1st or 2nd Century AD, itself a copy of a Greek statue from the 2nd C BC (now lost). Whichever way you look at it, it’s pretty near perfect.

Lelys Venus

Here’s the Sutton Hoo Helm and it’s replica.

Sutton Hoo Helm

Ribchester hoard face mask

 

I guess the Sutton Hoo Helmet is one of the pieces that most people know about and it is, indeed, marvellous, especially when shown next to a replica showing how it would have originally looked. But I was even more fascinated by the Roman face mask from the Ribchester Hoard, probably dating from the late first, or early second century AD.

Here it is.

 

 

And now to the Parthenon Marbles. (No longer called the Elgin Marbles, I understand.) I don’t know what I’d expected… a load of friezes, I thought. I didn’t expect such three dimensionality (is that a term?)

Parth Marbs 03

I was particularly entranced by the naturalistic sculptures. These riders look as if they could spring to life at any moment. Their hands are in the correct positions for the reins, they look very comfortable, even riding bareback, and by the placement of their feet their mounts are smaller than we would expect a man to ride these days, almost pony-sized, though quite clearly from their conformation NOT ponies. I wonder what these marbles looked like when first completed. Several of the horses’ heads have holes at the corners of their mouths and up behind the ears, so I guess there would have been bridles of some kind, though whether leather or metal I don’t know. Perhaps I should have bought that guide book after all. On the other hand, finding these small puzzles brings out my writerly sensawunder.

Parth Marbs 17 Selene's horseHere’s the head of a horse from Selene’s chariot. You can quite clearly see where the bridle was originally attached.

There’s a recurring theme of Centaurs battling Lapiths, again beautifully realistic.

Parth Marbs Centaurs v Lapiths

Assyrian 02 Human headed bullOn the way out of the Parthenon Marbles exhibition I came across these guys – Huge human headed bulls from Assyria. The first one is a winged human-headed bull dates about 865 – 860 BC from Nimrud. This protective spirit guarded the entrance into what might have been the king’s apartments. The other one of the pair is in the Metropolitan Museum in New York

Khorsabad 03

And this is one of a complete pair, from the Palace of Sargon II, Khorsabad. They stood at the gates of the citadel as magic guardians against misfortune. They date from 721 to 705 BC.

Now I’ve seen it once, I want to go back to the British Museum at my leisure, stay longer… and maybe buy a guidebook.

There’s a lot of fodder for writers’ brains here.

 

 

 

 

 

On the way home I was struck by the elegance of the new Western Concourse at King’s Cross Station. I’ve seen it before, of course, but just having seen the central court at the BM, I wondered if it was also a Norman Foster design, so I looked it up. It was designed by John McAslan and Partners. And very nice it is, too.

Kings Cross Western Concourse

 

Posted in fantasy, science fiction, writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Science for Fiction 2019

Imperial

Imperial College

Science For Fiction is an annual event organised by Dr. David Clements at Imperial College, London. It’s a series of lectures by scientists at the cutting edge of their field, specifically aimed at writers. (Unsurprisingly a load of Science Fiction writers attend, most of whom I know from attending Milford.) The location is perfect. Imperial College is just a short walk from the Science Museum, Natural History Museum and the Victoria and Albert.

In previous years we’ve hit a heatwave which (since the college lecture halls are not air conditioned) has been gruelling, but London was blessedly (comparatively) cool this year.

Beit Quad from 219Accommodation was interesting. We usually stay in the university halls of residence since they are reasonably cheap (for London) and extremely convenient. We’ve been in modern accommodation at Southside in previous years, but this year we were in Beit (pronounced Bite) Hall which is the older building next to the Albert Hall, seen in the background of this photograph. The Beit quad incorporates the student union bar, where we’ve gathered after lectures in previous years. (NOTE – they do good jugs of Pimms perfect for a hot summer evening.) I shared a twin room with T up on the second floor, overlooking the Quad. It was a bit noisy as the evening wore on, but the denizens of the bar quietened down before midnight and mornings were quiet. It was a very handy location for getting to lectures in the Huxley Building. The beds were a bit hard for my taste, and our nearest lift was broken, but I’d be inclined to book there again next year instead of Southside, simply for the convenience

And now to the lectures:

On Wednesday afternoon we had Jess Wade on Materials and Chirality. She should probably have defined chirality before launching into the lecture, instead of waiting until it was halfway through. But we got there in the end. Her field is research into LEDs.

Matt GengeMatt Genge did a fascinating talk on A Fall of Cosmic Dust. He’s a good speaker and the subject matter – what falls to earth – was fascinating, from dust to meteors/meteorites.

On Thursday the first session was Rachael Livermore on Einstein’s Telescope, talking about gravitational lensing effects and the Event Horizon telescope – a worldwide array of telescopes linked together which can photograph galaxies as far away as 55 million light years.

Climate graphJoanna Haigh gave a great talk on Climate Change, though possibly with far too many graphs to really take in. She gave some useful websites:

  • tool.globalcalculator.org
  • flood.firetree.net
  • carbonbrief.org
  • imperial.ac.uk/grantham/

Katie Mack entertained and educated us with 4 Ways to End the Universe: Big Crunch/Heat Death/Big Rip/Vacuum Decay, and managed to tailor it to science fiction, which was very useful.

CassiniGreg Hunt finished off with Old and New Highlights from Cassini at Saturn, which also included a bit on Enceladus and Titan. In 2022  they will launch JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer) which will take 7 years to get to Jupiter. Then, launching in 2026 there will be the Dragonfly mission to Titan, arriving 2034. Exciting stuff – if we all live that long!

We had our usual Wednesday evening group dinner at Memories of India on Gloucester Road as in previous years, but hit graduation celebrations. There were four big parties in there, including us, so though the food was excellent, it was too noisy to talk. Pity.

British MuseumT and I stayed over an extra night to visit the British Museum on Friday, which should be (and possibly will be) a blog post in its own right. Hideously expensive left luggage at Kings Cross. £12.50 per bag, even though mine was little more than a big handbag! The BM is fabulous. I was impressed with the building itself, including the modern Norman Foster designed courtyard. Exhibits that took my fancy included the Sutton Hoo helmet, the room that was King George’s library which now holds the Enlightenment exhibits (as much for the room as the contents) and, of course, the Parthenon Marbles, which they don’t seem to be calling the Elgin Marbles any more. There were loads of school parties, probably because it’s the end of term, but it was still a good visit. Then a meal at King’s Cross, but – massive disappointment – Giraffe no longer does fish finger sandwiches. Though what was Patisserie Valerie is now Costa Coffee – so that was good, at least.

And the trains were on time – both ways. Bonus!

Posted in fantasy, science fiction, writing | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Book Browsing

OrlandoThis is a revamp of a post from 2013, updated

The tor.com blog had a feature on book browsing back in September 2013 and it prompted this original post, reminding me that I so very rarely got to browse real books on real shelves any more. I still don’t, so it’s probably even more relevant now than it was then. I’ve always been drawn to look at those tightly packed collections of spines whether in a bookshop, a library or on a friend’s bookshelves.

My book browsing began early. I joined the library at six, which was the age you were allowed to have library tickets in those days and my first borrowed book was ‘Orlando the Marmalade Cat’. I still recall the pictures, though for the life of me I can’t remember the details of the story.

White RidersFrom then on I borrowed my maximum two books a week until I persuaded my parents to part with some of their library tickets and I graduated to five. I loved my library books, and the choosing of them was a long and pleasurable task each Saturday morning. My parents could just drop me off and pick me up when they’d finished their shopping. I certainly wasn’t going to run off. Run away? From books? I had to check every single shelf on every bay of (fiction) shelving throughout the whole children’s library. From picture books I quickly moved to chapter books and by the age of seven or eight I was reading every pony book I could find, books by Monica Edwards, the Pullein-Thompson sisters and Ruby Ferguson. They were easy to browse for. A horse’s head on the spine, right?

Spaceship to SaturnWhile looking for pony books one day I found: The Horse and His Boy and that was my introduction to Narnia. I’m not sure how I made the leap from there to science fiction, but Hugh Walters featured heavily on my reading list and I ate up the stories of Chris the boy astronaut, implausibly sent into space in an emergency,  because rockets were not large or powerful enough to carry a full grown man. (Obviously no small women capable of flying a space ship in those days!)

Eventually I became the children’s librarian in Barnsley – looking after the library that kick-started my love of books, but that’s a post for another day.

When I could afford to buy books I browsed in W. H. Smith – the nearest Barnsley offered to a bookshop.

Browsing was important. It introduced me to many authors I would otherwise never have found. I moved on from pony books to John Wyndham, and from Day of the Triffids to the Gollancz yellow jackets on the shelves of the mobile library. (We’d moved out of town by that time and had books delivered to the village every Monday evening by the well-stocked library van.)

Borders closingThese days I rarely shop in town centres, and I maybe visit the closest mall once or twice a year. When I do I’m usually with someone who doesn’t share my book-browsing habit. Now I browse on the internet, usually Amazon or Goodreads or Netgalley.com. I read reviews before I buy, and I love my Kindle with a passion (hey I can carry as many books in my handbag as Hermione Granger!) BUT – and it’s a  a big but – it’s hardly a substitute for the randomness of browsing physical books. On my rare trips to York one of my guilty pleasures used to be spending a couple of hours in the much-missed Borders book shop opposite Betty’s Café (the SF section, of course). That’s where I found Joe Abercrombie (or at least, his books) amongst others. Though I note there is a Waterstones on Coney Street in York. I must check it our next time I go.

There used to be a tiny independent bookshop in Denby Dale, just five minutes drive down the road from where I live. The chap there was most obliging and he’d order anything and get it within a few days, but his SF section consisted of a few Stephen Kings and the odd Tolkien (though his YA section was more adventurous). Sadly he died suddenly and unexpectedly, and the bookshop died with him.

I really miss my browsing.

Do you browse? If so, where?

Posted in fantasy, science fiction, writing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

For the Love of Prequels – A guest post by Gail Z. Martin

Convicts&ExilesCoverOne of the tricky parts of telling a story is knowing where to start. The beginning of the interesting part isn’t always the place to start the main tale. That’s especially true when the main story is truly epic in scope. And yet, the backstory sets the stage. How does an author decide?

Enter the prequel. I’ve done a prequel series once before—the Jonmarc Vahanian Adventures, which are a prequel of sorts for the Chronicles of the Necromancer series. The serialized novels (now collected in ebook and paperback as The Shadowed Path and The Dark Road) trace the backstory of a key character, one who shows up with a hidden and tragic past. Readers wanted to know more, and the new books fill in those missing pieces.

For the Ascendant Kingdoms Saga, the situation worked a little differently. Something big happens at the beginning of Ice Forged, the first book in the series, and then there’s a six-year gap before the main action begins. What occurs during those ‘missing’ six years is important to make the main characters who they are, but something of a tangent to the main story. I left them out of the novel, but readers wanted to know more.

So I came back to that series and wrote the stories of the gap years. Three of those novellas—about Blaine’s time as a convict—were released as individual ebooks. Two short stories appeared in anthologies, or as standalone. Then I wrote the fourth novella about Blaine’s years as a colonist, and the story was finally complete.

Convicts and Exiles is the whole package, arranged chronologically, to tell the complete story. It’s available in ebook and paperback. If you haven’t read the series yet, I’d suggest reading the first chapter of Ice Forged, then read Convicts and Exiles, and go back to finishing Ice Forged and the rest of the series. And if you’ve already read the novels, you won’t have any difficulty picking up the missing pieces, since Convicts and Exiles includes an excerpt from Ice Forged that leads right into the new action. We also brought out the fourth novella as an ebook for those who had purchased the other pieces separately.

However you choose to explore the Ascendant Kingdoms Saga, you’ll have an action-packed post-apocalyptic medieval epic fantasy thrill ride!

You can find Convicts & Exiles in ebook and paperback wherever online books are sold!

0061-eWomenNetwork

Gail Martin, Dreamspinner Communications

Gail Z Martin. The Hawthorn Moon is the annual summer blog tour for Gail Z. Martin, and features guest blog posts, giveaways, surprises, excerpts and more on blogs worldwide. Find the master list of posts and goodies at www.GailZMartin.com  Bonus goodies! Read a copy of my Deadly Curiosities urban fantasy short story Catspaw for free: https://claims.prolificworks.com/free/UAjd6 and check out my epic fantasy Ascendant Kingdoms short story Reconciling Memory here for free: https://claims.prolificworks.com/free/JQorl

Giveaway! Enter for a chance to win a copy of The Splintered Crown and Convicts and Exiles http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/9751c04221/?

Gail Z. Martin writes urban fantasy, epic fantasy and steampunk for Solaris Books, Orbit Books, Falstaff Books, SOL Publishing and Darkwind Press. Urban fantasy series include Deadly Curiosities and the Night Vigil (Sons of Darkness). Epic fantasy series include Darkhurst, the Chronicles Of The Necromancer, the Fallen Kings Cycle, the Ascendant Kingdoms Saga, and the Assassins of Landria. Newest titles include Convicts and Exiles, Spells Salt and Steel Season One, Tangled Web, Vengeance, The Dark Road, Sons of Darkness, and Assassin’s Honor.

She is the co-author (with Larry N. Martin ) of  the Spells, Salt, and Steel/New Templars series; the Steampunk series Iron & Blood; and a collection of short stories and novellas: The Storm & Fury Adventures set in the Iron & Blood universe. She is also the co-author of the upcoming Wasteland Marshals series and the Joe Mack Cauldron/Shadow Council series.  As Morgan Brice, she writes urban fantasy MM paranormal romance. Series include Witchbane, Badlands, and Treasure Trail.

Join our Shadow Alliance street team so you never miss a new release! Get all the scoop first + giveaways + fun stuff! Also where I get my beta readers and Launch Team! https://www.facebook.com/groups/435812789942761

Find me at www.GailZMartin.com , on Twitter @GailZMartin on www.Facebook.com/WinterKingdoms at www.DisquietingVisions.com blog, on www.Pinterest.com/Gzmartin on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/GailZMartin and BookBub https://www.bookbub.com/profile/gail-z-martin I’m also the organizer of the #HoldOnToTheLight campaign www.HoldOnToTheLight.com Never miss out on the news with my newsletter  http://eepurl.com/dd5XLj

Posted in fantasy, writing | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment